Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

London Wall

 
 
London Wall image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 12, 2013
1. London Wall
Inscription.
This is one of the most impressive surviving section of London's former city wall.

The lower part, with its characteristic tile bonding courses, was built by the Romans around 200 AD. Its purpose may have been as much to control passage of goods and people as for defence. Against its inner face on this side, the wall was reinforced by a substantial earth rampart. Outside was a wide ditch. In the far right hand corner, evidence of an internal turret was found in excavation. This probably contained a staircase giving access to the sentry walk. Complete with its battlements, the Roman wall would have been about 6.4 metres high.

During the medieval period, the wall was repaired and heightened. From the 17th century it fell into disuse and parts were demolished. Several sections, including this one, were preserved by being incorporated into later buildings.

For Your Safety
Please take care as historic sites can be hazardous.
Children should be kept under close control.

Wilfull damage to the monument is an offense.
Unauthorised use of metal detectors is prohibited.

For more information on this site, and how to join English Heritage, please contact: 0171 973 3479

Statue believed to be of the Roman Emperor Trajan, A.D. 98-117. 'Imperator Caesar Nerva Trajanus
London Wall image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 12, 2013
2. London Wall
Augustus' Presented by the Tower Hill improvement trust at the request of the Reverend P.B. Clayton, CH, MC, DD. Founder Padre of TOC H.
 
Erected by English Heritage.
 
Location. 51° 30.593′ N, 0° 4.569′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is on Tower Hill. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: City of London, England EC3N 4DR, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tower Hill Execution Site (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Monument (approx. 0.7 kilometers away); St Paul's School (approx. 1.5 kilometers away); Poulters' Hall (approx. 1.7 kilometers away); Royal College of Physicians (approx. 1.8 kilometers away); Giltspur Street Compter (approx. 1.9 kilometers away); To The Immortal Memory of Sir William Wallace (approx. 1.9 kilometers away); Charles Lamb (approx. 1.9 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .  History of the London Wall. English Heritage's history of the London Wall: "From its earliest foundation the Roman city of Londinium was almost certainly surrounded by some kind of fortification. As well as providing defence, the construction of a stone
Roman Emperor Trajan Statue with the London Wall in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 12, 2013
3. Roman Emperor Trajan Statue with the London Wall in the Background
Statue believed to be of the Roman Emperor Trajan, A.D. 98-117. 'Imperator Caesar Nerva Trajanus'. Presented by the Tower Hill improvement trust at the request of the Reverend P.B. Clayton, CH, MC, DD. Founder Padre of TOC H. - From plaque on statue.

Note the red tile bands on the wall, as mentioned in the English Heritage link.
wall represented the status of the city. Using the evidence of excavated coins, archaeologists have dated the construction of the first stone city wall to between ad 190 and 225. The wall was about 4km (2.5 miles) long, enclosing an area of about 134 hectares (330 acres); it originally included four city gates with an additional entrance into the legionary fortress at Cripplegate. In front of the eastern face of the wall was a ditch, which was up to 1.8 metres (6 feet) deep and 4.8 metres (16 feet) across. This section of the wall stood close to the south-east corner of the ditch, now lying inside the bailey of the Tower of London. It is built of rubble (mostly Kentish ragstone) bound in a hard mortar, and faced on either side by roughly squared ragstone blocks. At every fifth or sixth course the wall incorporates a horizontal band of red Roman tiles, intended to ensure the courses remained level over long stretches of masonry. This gives the wall its distinctive striped appearance. This section shows signs of medieval alteration, particularly in its upper portions, and its original height is unknown; but at about 10.7 metres (35 foot) above present ground level it is one of the tallest surviving sections parts of the circuit...."
(Submitted on August 23, 2015, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 20, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 296 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 20, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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