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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Midway in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

George Washington

 
 
George Washington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
1. George Washington Marker
Inscription.
On his way to Philadelphia
Friday July 1, 1791
stopped in this building
known as
Cookerly's Tavern.

 
Erected 1932 by Frederick, MD. Chapter D.A.R.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the George Washington Slept Here marker series.
 
Location. 39° 33.835′ N, 77° 17.782′ W. Marker is in New Midway, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Woodsboro Pike (State Highway 194) 0.1 miles south of Renner Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New Midway MD 21775, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Frederick Road (approx. 4.3 miles away); Middleburg (approx. 4.5 miles away); “Terra Rubra” (approx. 4.7 miles away); Army of the Potomac (approx. 4.8 miles away); Birthplace of Francis Scott Key (approx. 4.8 miles away); Francis Scott Key (approx. 5.2 miles away); Israel's Creek (approx. 5.3 miles away); The First Reaping Machine (approx. 5.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  How Whiskey Almost Started a War. An article which briefly discusses George Washington's
Marker and Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
2. Marker and Tavern
stay at the tavern. Washington was on his way to York, and also nearby Terra Rubra, to bid farewell to the Maryland troops. (Submitted on June 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. George Washington's Diary -
“Friday, July 1, – received an address from the inhabitants of Fredericktown, and about 7 o’clock left it—dined at one Cookerly’s, thirteen miles off, and lodged at Taneytown, only twelve miles farther, being detained at the first stage by rain and to answer the address which had been presented to me in the morning.”
    — Submitted January 3, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

2. Cookerly's Tavern - During the War of 1812
On January 20, 1814, months before the British burned Washington, the Uniontown Engine of Liberty and Uniontown Advertiser reported that “Agreeable to public notice given for the Celebration of the late Victories of the Allied Armies over Bonaparte, a large and respectable number of citizens of Frederick county and elsewhere, convened at Mr. Peter Cookerly’s Tavern in Taney-Town; after enjoying an elegant Dinner, ... the following
The Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
3. The Tavern
toasts were given...” among the 40 toasts listed one was to "James Madison, President - ’tis mortifying to think what he was, ’tis infamy in the extreme to see what he now is - the tool of a bloody tyrant - the author of a wicked and wasteful War, conducted with extreme folly, and ending in extreme disgrace." The "Allied Armies" that beat Napoleon were allied with the British not the US.
    — Submitted January 3, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Categories. Patriots & Patriotism
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,369 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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