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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anahuac in Chambers County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

William Barret Travis

(August 9, 1809 - March 6, 1836)

 
 
William Barret Travis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, August 1, 2015
1. William Barret Travis Marker
Inscription. Co-commander with James Bowie, siege of the Alamo. Born in South Carolina; moved with family in 1818 to Alabama, where at 19 he was admitted to the bar; came to Texas 1831. In Anahuac he joined William H. Jack and others resisting tyranny of customs collector Juan Davis Bradburn and was jailed 50 days in the fort (1832). In 1835 he led in capture and disarming of Mexican garrison reoccupying Fort Anahuac.
As lieutenant of volunteers sent to key city San Antonio in war against Mexican dictator Santa Anna, he drew men and food into the Alamo on Feb. 23, 1836, and defied with a cannon shot Santa Anna's call to surrender. On Feb. 24, civilian leader James Bowie fell ill, leaving 26-year-old Travis in charge. At Travis' call for aid, 32 men from Gonzales joined the Alamo forces, but Fannin's 500 failed to march in time from Goliad. With doom upon him, Travis drew line on floor to separate men wishing to leave from those staying; only one left. The 182 remaining - including hero Davy Crockett - made Santa Anna's army of 2,500 pay dearly for triumph on March 6, 1836. Travis' last message, telling of his resolution to achieve victory or death in face of the foe's overwhelming numbers, has been called one of the world's noblest documents.
 
Erected 1971 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker
William Barret Travis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, August 1, 2015
2. William Barret Travis Marker
Number 9135.)
 
Location. 29° 45.331′ N, 94° 41.289′ W. Marker is in Anahuac, Texas, in Chambers County. Marker is at the intersection of Unnamed roads within the park and Unnamed roads within the park on Unnamed roads within the park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Anahuac TX 77514, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Juan Davis Bradburn (within shouting distance of this marker); Robert McAlpin Williamson (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Anahuac (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Anahuac (within shouting distance of this marker); Round Point (approx. 1 miles away); Birthplace of Governor Ross Shaw Sterling (1875-1949) (approx. 3.2 miles away); Turtle Bayou Resolutions (approx. 6.1 miles away); Chambers County Youth Project Show (approx. 6.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anahuac.
 
More about this marker. Incise on the base: Erected by Chambers County Historical Survey Committee Guy C. Jackson III, Chairman
 
Regarding William Barret Travis. Travis is one of the most famous figures in Texas history. Travis County is named for him. There are Travis Streets and schools all over Texas. Houston has both a high school and an elementary school each named for him. There are other structures and buildings named for him everywhere in Texas. Remember he was only 26 when he was killed as commander at the Alamo.
 
Also see . . .
1. From Fort Wikipedia. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. From The Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. On the Texas A&M Website. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
4. Travis in the Lone Star Junction. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
5. On The Humanities Texas Website. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. War, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 285 times since then and 95 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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