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Near Burlington in Big Horn County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

McCullough Peaks Wild Horses

Wyoming

 
 
McCullough Peaks Wild Horses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
1. McCullough Peaks Wild Horses Marker
Inscription.
      No larger than a dog, the eohippus, or dawn horse, first appeared approximately 55 million years ago. It had four toes on its front legs and three on its hind legs. Eohippus remains have been found in Wyoming’s Wind River Basin. Over time, the eohippus evolved into Equus - - the horse as we know it. The horse became extinct in America about 8,000 years ago. In the fifteenth century, Spanish explorers and missionaries reintroduced it to the Americas. Legend has it today’s wild horses are the seed stock of horses that escaped from early Spanish expeditions, but only after the 1680 Pueblo Revolt did large numbers of wild horses appear on the grasslands of the plains.

      Wild horses in the McCullough Peaks vicinity are part of the Wyoming Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Herd Management Area. This fifteen mile (109,814 acre) public rangeland is located roughly 12 miles east of Cody, Wyoming. The BLM strives to maintain a herd of approximately 100 animals.

      McCullough Peaks wild horses represent many coat and color patterns and are known for their variety. The animals are moderate to large in size and usually in superb physical condition. Typical coat colors include brown, black, chestnut, sorrel, white, buckskin, palomino, gray, blue, red and strawberry roans. Patterns such as piebald and skewbald are common.

McCullough Peaks Wild Horses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
2. McCullough Peaks Wild Horses Marker
      The BLM National Wild Horse and Burro Program provides for adoption of wild horses and burros removed from public lands. Legal transfer of the animals take place after the BLM determines they have been properly cared for during the initial adoption year. The 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burros Act provides for the animals’ protection, control and management. Subsequent laws, including the 1978 Public Rangelands Improvement Act, define responsibilities for monitoring and balancing rangeland values, including wild horses.
 
Location. 44° 27.513′ N, 108° 31.603′ W. Marker is near Burlington, Wyoming, in Big Horn County. Marker is on Greybull Hwy (U.S. 20 / 16), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burlington WY 82411, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Shortcut to the Goldfields (a few steps from this marker).
 
Categories. Animals
 
Wyoming Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
3. Wyoming Markers
Two markers can be found at this location. The McCullough Peaks Wild Horses marker is seen here on the right.
McCullough Peaks Wild Horses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
4. McCullough Peaks Wild Horses Marker
Wild Horse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 22, 2015
5. Wild Horse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 9, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 193 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 9, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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