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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Banner in Sheridan County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Protecting the Travelers or the Garrison?

 
 
Protecting the Travelers or the Garrison? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
1. Protecting the Travelers or the Garrison? Marker
Inscription.
The mission of the Fort Phil Kearny garrison was to guard travelers on the Bozeman Trail, but it soon became apparent that the guards would also need protection. Therefore, on July 13, 1866, Captain Tenador Ten Eyck began building a fort which had been designed by Colonel Henry Carrington before they left Fort Stephen Kearny. The fortís 800 by 600 foot long walls were made of 11” by 12” logs buried three feet in the ground. There were firing notches cut along the banquet at every fifth log, and blockhouses or gun-bastions on two opposite corners to provide enfilading fire along the walls. The main gate was located on the east wall, and smaller five foot wide officerís gates were originally located on each of the other walls. Each gate was provided with a locking mechanism. Five guard stands were located to provide 24 hour surveillance of the grounds both inside and outside the post.

Before you is a reproduction of the stockade, guard stand, officerís gate and artillery bastion as originally built at Fort Phil Kearny. From this position we know Col. Carrington fired artillery at the Native Americans who opposed the fort.

At the time of construction few military forts in the West had stockades. Would it have been better to train the raw recruits to protect the travelers? Was the time used to build the 2,800
Marker Inside Fort Phil Kearny image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
2. Marker Inside Fort Phil Kearny
The stockade, guard stand and artillery bastion of Fort Phil Kearny can be seen behind the marker.
feet of stockade wasted?
 
Location. 44° 31.953′ N, 106° 49.64′ W. Marker is in Banner, Wyoming, in Sheridan County. Marker can be reached from Wagon Box Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located inside Fort Phil Kearny. Marker is in this post office area: Banner WY 82832, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Touring the Fort (here, next to this marker); Officers Row (within shouting distance of this marker); The Fort Kearny Sawmills (within shouting distance of this marker); Pilot Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of a Sawmill (within shouting distance of this marker); A monument Honoring John “Portugee” Phillips (within shouting distance of this marker); Cemetery Site (within shouting distance of this marker); The Bozeman Trail (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Banner.
 
More about this marker. The bottom left of the marker contains a picture of “Colonel Carringtonís conceptual drawing of stockade and map of Military Stockade Location.” Next to this is an “Artist conceptual drawing prior to archaeological discoveries.”
 
Also see . . .  Fort Phil Kearny State Historic Site
Protecting the Travelers or the Garrison? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
3. Protecting the Travelers or the Garrison? Marker
. (Submitted on August 25, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
Main Gate at Fort Phil Kearny image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
4. Main Gate at Fort Phil Kearny
The Protecting the Travelers or the Garrison? marker can be seen inside the fort.
Guard Stand, Artillery Bastion and Stockade at Ft. Phil Kearny image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
5. Guard Stand, Artillery Bastion and Stockade at Ft. Phil Kearny
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 158 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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