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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Foggy Bottom in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Peace at Last!

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

 
 
Peace at Last! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
1. Peace at Last! Marker
Inscription. The Octagon Once was the city residence of wealthy Virginia landowner Colonel John Tayloe III. After the British burned the White House and other government buildings, President James Madison accepted Tayloe's invitation to use the Octagon as a temporary Executive Mansion. He brought along 15-year-old enslaved servant Paul Jennings and other household help It was here on February 17, 1815, that the president signed the Treaty of Ghent, ending the War of 1812.

Eyewitness

In his memoir, formerly enslaved White House servant Paul Jennings recalled the moments following the signing. “Miss Sally Coles … cry(ed] out, ‘Peace! peace!‘ and told John Freeman (the butler) to serve out wine liberally to the servants and others,” he wrote. “I played the President's March on the violin … and such another joyful time was never seen in Washington.“

In the summer of 1814 the United States had been at war with Great Britain for two years. Battlefronts had erupted from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. On August 24. following their victory Over the Americans at the Battle of Bladensburg. Maryland. British troops marched on Washington with devastating results.

The Star-Spangled Banner National History Trail reveals sites of the War of 1812 in Washington. DC., Virginia,
Peace at Last! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
2. Peace at Last! Marker
and Maryland. Visit ChesapeakeExploreApp.com or download the Chesapeake Explorer app.

 
Erected 2015.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks, and the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.779′ N, 77° 2.497′ W. Marker is in Foggy Bottom, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of New York Avenue Northwest and 18th Street Northwest when traveling west on New York Avenue Northwest. Touch for map. At the Octagon Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1799 New York Ave Northwest, Washington DC 20006, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Octagon (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. John A. Rawlins Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); The American Red Cross - Harvard Field Hospital Unit (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); National Headquarters, American Red Cross (about 700 feet away); Winder Building (about 700 feet away); First Division War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Constitution Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away); NSDAR Founders Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Foggy Bottom.
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
Three Markers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
3. Three Markers
The Octagon image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
4. The Octagon
The Signing of the Treaty of Ghent, Christmas Eve, 1814 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
5. The Signing of the Treaty of Ghent, Christmas Eve, 1814
Oil by Sir Amédée Forestier, 1914, Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Close-up of image on marker
Paul Jennings, Author of the first White House Memoir image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
6. Paul Jennings, Author of the first White House Memoir
Close-up of photo on marker
Family of Sylvia Jennings
President Madison Signed the Treaty of Ghent on this table. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
7. President Madison Signed the Treaty of Ghent on this table.
Close-up of photo on marker
Jane Kinsman
Marble Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
8. Marble Plaque
This building known as the Octagon built in 1800 for Col. John Tayloe of Mount Airy Virginia was occupied by President Madison after the burning of the President's House by the British on August 14, 1814. Here The Treaty of Ghent was ratified by Madison February 17 1815.
National Landmark Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
9. National Landmark Plaque
The Octagon
has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark
Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustrating the history of the United States.
U. S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1961
Stewart L.Udall
Secretary of the Interior
Conrad L. Wirth
Director National Park Service
Treaty Room Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
10. Treaty Room Plaque
The Treaty of Peace Terminating the War of 1812
Between the United States and Great Britain
Was Signed in This Room February 17, 1815

Erected February 17, 1909 by the National Society of United States Daughters of 1812 - District of Columbia Chapter
The Treaty Room image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
11. The Treaty Room
Col. John Tayloe image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
12. Col. John Tayloe
By Farvret De Saint Memin, in the Octagon Museum.
Dr. William Thornton<br>(Architect of the Octagon & the Capitol) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
13. Dr. William Thornton
(Architect of the Octagon & the Capitol)
By Farvret De Saint Memin in the Octagon Museum.
A I A image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
14. A I A
The Octagon now belongs to the American Institute of Architects.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 309 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on August 23, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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