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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Williamson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Negro Fine Arts School

 
 
Negro Fine Arts School Texas Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, June 29, 2014
1. Negro Fine Arts School Texas Historical Marker
Inscription. Twenty years before the integration of the Georgetown public school district, a progressive music professor and her three students embarked on a program to explore a new musical teaching theory and give African American children a chance to learn music. In the fall of 1946, Southwestern University professor Iola Bowden Chambers and her students began teaching piano lessons to children in the African American community. Through the cooperation of the Georgetown school board, the First Methodist Church of Georgetown and the Christian Student Association of Southwestern University, the Negro Fine Arts School was funded and championed.

During the schoolís existence, the First Methodist Church, which housed the school, welcomed over 200 students through its doors who participated in the program. The school expanded to provide voice and art lessons, produced a recital at the end of every year, and provided scholarships to its students. The scholarship program provided assistance for every year the recipient was enrolled in college. The school also produced several distinguished alumni who pursued degrees in music and taught other young aspiring musicians.

The Negro Fine Arts School not only provided musical avenues and self esteem for its students, but opportunities for other community members to interact with African
Negro Fine Arts School Marker and First United Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, June 29, 2014
2. Negro Fine Arts School Marker and First United Methodist Church
Americans and to understand the injustice of racial segregation. The Negro Fine Arts School introduced children to the universal language of music and helped pave the way for peaceful school integration that would begin in 1965.
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16262.)
 
Location. 30° 37.989′ N, 97° 40.394′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, Texas, in Williamson County. Marker is at the intersection of East University Avenue (State Highway 29) and Ash Street, on the right when traveling east on East University Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 410 E University Ave, Georgetown TX 78626, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First United Methodist Church of Georgetown (a few steps from this marker); Original Site of Southwestern University (within shouting distance of this marker); George Irvine House (within shouting distance of this marker); Georgetown High School Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); W.Y. Penn Home (about 400 feet away); J. A. McDougle Home (about 400 feet away); C.C. and Mattie Hughes Cody House (about 500 feet away); St. Johnís United Methodist Church (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located in front of the First United Methodist Church.
 
Also see . . .  Negro Fine Arts School historical maker dedication (pdf file). Williamson County Historical Commission (Submitted on October 6, 2015.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansArts, Letters, MusicEducation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2015, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 138 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 7, 2015, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas.   2. submitted on August 23, 2015, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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