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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newell in Modoc County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Tule Lake Segregation Center

WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Tule Lake Unit

 
 
Tule Lake Segregation Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 20, 2015
1. Tule Lake Segregation Center Marker
Inscription. World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument was established in 2008, in part to serve as a reminder of the grave injustices endured by Japanese Americans incarcerated at the Tule Lake Segregation Center. The Tule Lake Unit also preserves a portion of the tumultuous history of the United States from the 1930s through the end of the war, through the stories of Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees, Japanese Americans, and Prisoners of War who are part of the history of Camp Tulelake. The Tulelake Unit is a reminder to all Americans that the Constitution is no more than a piece of paper unless we are willing to defend its principles.
The Tule Lake Segregation Center was constructed in 1942 as one of ten War Relocation Centers. Initially it held 15,276 of the approximately 110,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry who were forcibly removed from their homes by the Presidential Executive Order 9066. It was transformed into a segregation center in 1943 following a deeply flawed loyalty questionnaire that was used to separate supposedly "loyal" from "disloyal" Japanese Americans. Under serration, the center's population expanded to 18,789. Overcrowding, harsh living conditions, and mismanagement contributed to the strife and controversy that led to construction of a stockade with a jail and the implementation of martial
Tule Lake Segregation Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 20, 2015
2. Tule Lake Segregation Center Marker
law.
Camp Tulelake was constructed as a Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) camp in 1935. Until 1942, Camp Tulelake housed young men from around the nation who were employed to rehabilitate and expand the use of of public lands. During World War II, the camp was used by the War Relocation Authority (WRA), first in February 1943 when it was used to imprison men from the Tule Lake Relocation Center who refused to answer the loyalty questionnaire. The camp was used a second time in October, to house 243 Japanese Americans from other War Relocation Centers who were brought in as strikebreakers to harvest crops at the Tule Lake Center. In 1944, after local farmers petitioned the U.S. government for additional farm labor, 150 Italian Prisons of War (POW) converted the camp into a POW camp. Soon 800 German POWs arrived at the camp and worked in the Tule Basin, helping local farmers tend and harvest their fields.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 41° 53.214′ N, 121° 22.302′ W. Marker is in Newell, California, in Modoc County. Marker is on County Route 176 near California Route 139, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tulelake CA 96134, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
The last remaining, on site, Tule Lake Segregation Center building image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 20, 2015
3. The last remaining, on site, Tule Lake Segregation Center building
are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tule Lake (approx. 0.2 miles away); Canby’s Cross (approx. 0.6 miles away); Captain Jack’s Stronghold (approx. 0.6 miles away); Warm Springs Indians (approx. 0.7 miles away); Petroglyph Point (approx. 3.1 miles away); Raptors - Birds of Prey (approx. 3.1 miles away); Burnett Cutoff - Muddy Waters (approx. 4.3 miles away); Attack at Hospital Rock (approx. 6.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newell.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tule Lake Concentration Camp - Japanese American National Museum. With the decision to segregate the "loyal" from the "disloyal" on the basis of the 1943 loyalty questionnaire, Tule Lake was chosen as the camp where "disloyals" would be isolated. Tule Lake became "Tule Lake Segregation Center" in the fall of 1943. (Submitted on August 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Tulelake History. Tule Lake was the largest and most conflict-ridden of the ten War Relocation Authority WRA camps used to carry out the government’s system of exclusion and detention of persons of Japanese descent, mandated by Executive Order 9066. (Submitted on August 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Asian AmericansWar, World II
 
Tule Lake Segregation Center guard tower image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 21, 2015
4. Tule Lake Segregation Center guard tower
Tule Lake Segregation Center building image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 21, 2015
5. Tule Lake Segregation Center building
Located at the WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument visitors center.
Quarters for a family of four image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 21, 2015
6. Quarters for a family of four
Tule Lake stockade gate image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1943
7. Tule Lake stockade gate
Tule Lake housing image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1943
8. Tule Lake housing
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 209 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 30, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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