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Harding in Morris County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Wick Farm

Morristown National Historical Park

 
 
The Wick Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2006
1. The Wick Farm Marker
Inscription.
Henry Wick lived here. His main cash crop – several hundred trees – fixed him more comfortably than most New Jersey farmers of his day.

Suddenly in December, 1779, 10,000 hungry soldiers became his guests. Many of them camped on his land, much of which was wooded then as it is now – at least it was wooded before the soldiers came. His home became the headquarters of General Arthur St. Clair, commander of the Pennsylvania Line.
 
Erected by Morristown National Historical Park.
 
Location. 40° 45.819′ N, 74° 32.546′ W. Marker is in Harding, New Jersey, in Morris County. Marker can be reached from Jockey Hollow Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in Morristown National Historical Park, behind the Jockey Hollow Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Morristown NJ 07960, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Wick Farm (here, next to this marker); Wick Farm Garden (within shouting distance of this marker); Roads (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Aqueduct Trail (about
Marker at Jockey Hollow image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2008
2. Marker at Jockey Hollow
400 feet away); Captain Adam Bettin (about 500 feet away); Hand’s Brigade (about 600 feet away); The Connecticut Line (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Second Maryland Brigade (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harding.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker features a picture of the Wick House.
 
Also see . . .  Morristown National Historical Park. National Park Service. (Submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable BuildingsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Wick Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2008
3. The Wick Farmhouse
The Wick House served as headquarters for Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair, then commander of the Pennsylvania Line encamped in Jockey Hollow, in 1779—80.
Gen. St. Clair's Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2008
4. Gen. St. Clair's Quarters
Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair stayed in this room in the Wick house during the winter of 1779-80.
The Wick Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2006
5. The Wick Farmhouse
This farmhouse was erected about 1750 by Henry Wick, a fairly prosperous farmer who had come to Morris County from Long Island a few years before. The garden can be seen in this photo to the right of the photo.
Barn at the Wick Farm image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2006
6. Barn at the Wick Farm
Tempe Wick, the youngest daughter of Henry Wick, is said to have concealed her riding horse in a bedroom of the house in January 1781, in order to prevent its seizure by Pennsylvania mutineers.
Revolutionary War Soldiers at the Wick House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2014
7. Revolutionary War Soldiers at the Wick House
Garden of The Wick Farm image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 10, 2006
8. Garden of The Wick Farm
The Wick Farm image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 5, 2008
9. The Wick Farm
The Wick Farm as seen from the Jockey Hollow Road. Before the Continental Army's arrival, farmer Henry Wick's main crop was trees.
Encampment on the Wick Farm image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 5, 2014
10. Encampment on the Wick Farm
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,295 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on July 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on July 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on April 5, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   8. submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   9. submitted on July 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   10. submitted on April 5, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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