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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bristol in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Dedicated to the Memory of Our Fallen Comrades

 
 
Dedicated to the Memory of Our Fallen Comrades Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
1. Dedicated to the Memory of Our Fallen Comrades Marker
Inscription.
Dedicated to the Memory
Of Our Fallen Comrades
And Presented to the City of Bristol By
Harold F. Emmett Post No. 994
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Of The United States.
July 17, 1926

 
Erected 1926 by Harold F. Emmett Post No. 994 Veterans of Foreign Wars.
 
Location. 41° 40.187′ N, 72° 56.184′ W. Marker is in Bristol, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Memorial Boulevard and Mellen Street, on the right when traveling west on Memorial Boulevard. Touch for map. Located on the breech of the captured German howitzer on display near the WW I Monument in Memorial Boulevard Park. Marker is in this post office area: Bristol CT 06010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bristol WW I Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Memorial Boulevard Commemoration (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bristol Veterans Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bristol World War II - Korean War Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Hiker
Captured WW I German Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
2. Captured WW I German Howitzer
The Marker is on the Breech of the German Howitzer
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Veterans Memorial Park (approx. mile away); Bristol World War I Memorial (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bristol.
 
More about this marker. German Howitzer Cannon 105mm - This cannon was presented to the city of Bristol by the Harold F. Emmett Post on July 17, 1926. This cannon was built in Germany in 1906 and captured by U.S. forces during WWI. U.S. Navy Admiral Herbert O. Dunn addressed the crowd of city officials, residents and Veterans along the Boulevard. He said "Long may it remain to teach a lesson to the coming generation, to stimulate in their young minds the heroic virtues of their fathers." Most World War I deaths and wounds were caused by artillery fire. Krupp industries in Germany was the main producer of was materials in both WW I and WW II. The 105mm Howitzer was manned in battle by six artillerymen and was most likely drawn by a team of horses. The wheels on this gun were made by a Wagoner in Pennsylvania Dutch Country after the original wheels were destroyed by a reckless driver on the Boulevard. The gun was originally located in the median in front of the World War I Memorial, but was placed in its present location to protect it
Captured WW I German Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 7, 2010
3. Captured WW I German Howitzer
In the background is the World War I Monument
from wayward drivers. The gun was damaged on at least two previous occasions. This gun was one of many which were brought back to the U.S.A. for evaluation and testing and then offered to veterans for memorial displays. The gun was donated to the city on July 17, 1926, by the Harold Emmett DAV Post. Mr. Emmett was wounded in action in WW1, had both his legs amputated, then returned to Bristol. He worked in the Bristol Tax Collector's Office. He never recovered in sound health and died soon after the end of WW1. - John (Jack) Denehy, Memorial Military Museum Inc.
 
Regarding Dedicated to the Memory of Our Fallen Comrades. This is not a German 105 mm howitzer. It is a German Model 1904 10cm Light Field Gun. For verification please see: http://www.passioncompassion1418.com/Canons/ImagesCanons/Allemagne/Legere/english_FC105K04Transinnes.html

Guns were designed for flatter trajectories, and howitzers were designed to fire at a much higher trajectory. I am trying to identify surviving WW I artillery pieces in the country - so I am not trying to simply be critical. You are a great resource.
 
Categories. War, World I
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 615 times since then and 31 times this year. Last updated on September 7, 2015, by Randal B. Gilbert of Tyler, Texas. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 23, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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