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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bemersyde in Scottish Borders, Scotland, United Kingdom
 

Scott's View

 
 
Scott's View Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
1. Scott's View Marker
Inscription.
Sir Walter Scott loved the Borders landscape, history and people with a passion. He was the most popular writer of his age: when he died his funeral procession was over a mile long. It took his body from his home at Abbotsford to his tomb in Dryburgh Abbey, down the hill to your left. Tradition tells how his horses stopped here on the way, just as they had done when their master was alive so he could enjoy his favourite view.

Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land!

Sir Walter Scott
The Lay of the Last Minstrel
 
Location. 55° 36.016′ N, 2° 38.807′ W. Marker is in Bemersyde, Scotland, in Scottish Borders. Marker is on B6356. Touch for map. Located at the roadside car park at the Eildon Hills overlook.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 14 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. An Eccentric Vision (approx. 1.6 kilometers away); Royal Connections (approx. 4.5 kilometers away); The Fletcher Monument (approx. 13.3 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Scott's View. (Submitted on September 23, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.)
2. Sir Walter Scott. (Submitted on September 23, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.)
Scott's View - Eildon Hills image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
2. Scott's View - Eildon Hills

3. Abbotsford - The Home of Sir Walter Scott. (Submitted on September 23, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, Music
 
Scott's View - Eildon Hills and Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
3. Scott's View - Eildon Hills and Kiosk
Eildon Hills image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
4. Eildon Hills
When the Romans occupied this area of Scotland, they named the Eildon Hills, Trimontium. Tri, referring to the 3 peaks and montium, meaning mountain.
Scott's View Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
5. Scott's View Kiosk
A Rocky View Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
6. A Rocky View Marker
Other marker located along the car park at Scott's View.
The Eildon Hills Scott admired are what's left of a chain of volcanic activity that stretched across the Borders 300 million years ago - before the age of the dinosaurs.

The hills you can see never reached the surface as true volcanoes. Instead they were forced as great molten blobs into the rock deep underneath, like jam being squirted into a doughnut. There they cooled slowly, forming rock much harder than the older rocks above. Since the, the older rocks have been worn away by rivers and glaciers, leaving the harder rock to form the eildon Hills.

Many of the walls you see around Borders fields are made of the hard rock, called whinstone.
Roman Invasion of Scotland image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
7. Roman Invasion of Scotland
Sign located at the Trimontium Roman Heritage Centre in the town of Melrose.
The Roman Fort of Trimontium image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 6, 2011
8. The Roman Fort of Trimontium
Sign located at the Trimontium Roman Heritage Centre in the town of Melrose.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 180 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on September 23, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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