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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
National Park in Gloucester County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Naval Engagement

Red Bank Battlefield

 
 
The Naval Engagement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
1. The Naval Engagement Marker
Inscription.
While the battle raged at Fort Mercer, American and British naval forces engaged in intense fire on the Delaware River. Earlier in the fall of 1777, American forces had sunk chevaux de fries (racks of wooden, spiked spears) in the Delaware River, which proved difficult for British ships to navigate. During the conflict, two British ships caught fire after running aground: the Augusta and the Merlin. The Agusta exploded the next day – a blast so loud it was heard as far north as Germantown in Philadelphia. The park displays multiple cannons and a portion of chevaux de fris recovered from the Delaware River.

[She] suddenly took fire at the stern, and in a moment She was in a blasé, & soon after blew up, with a thundering noise. . . ”
Jeremiah Greenman, 1777

 
Erected 2015 by New Jersey Historical Commission.
 
Location. 39° 52.244′ N, 75° 11.4′ W. Marker is in National Park, New Jersey, in Gloucester County. Marker can be reached from Hessian Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is on the Red Bank Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: National Park NJ 08063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are
The Naval Engagement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
2. The Naval Engagement Marker
The Delaware River, where the naval battle took place, can be seen behind the marker.
within walking distance of this marker. Brigadier General Hugh Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Mercer at Red Bank / Fort Mercer is Alerted (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); Archaeology at Red Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Red Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); Flag of Fort Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); African American Soldiers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in National Park.
 
More about this marker. The upper right of the marker contains an oil painting depicting the “Destruction of HMS Augusta done by a British naval officer. The bottom left of the marker features a map of the plan of assault on Red Bank, 1777. It has a caption of “This map shows Fort Mercer and its proximity to ‘Mud Island’, better known today as Fort Mifflin. Note the heavy naval presence in the Delaware River and the chevaux de fries blocking the British fleet. Below this is a picture of a Chevaux de Frise with the caption “Chevaux de frise were used to block British access to Philadelphia. They consisted of weighted boxes, sunk
Marker on the Red Bank Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
3. Marker on the Red Bank Battlefield
in the Delaware River, with wooden, iron-tipped spears lying just below the water line, ready to pierce the hulls of British naval vessels.”
 
Also see . . .  Red Bank Battlefield. Account of the action at Fort Mercer during the Revolutionary War. (Submitted on October 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
The Naval Engagement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
4. The Naval Engagement Marker
Chevaux-de-frise image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 11, 2008
5. Chevaux-de-frise
This display at Fort Mifflin shows an example of the chevaux-de-frise that the Americans placed in the Delaware River to obstruct British ships. To the left are the actual tops of the chevaux-de-frise spikes.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 154 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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