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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
National Park in Gloucester County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Aftermath

Red Bank Battlefield

 
 
The Aftermath Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
1. The Aftermath Marker
Inscription.
Ye English soldiers came . . . They took two mares from me . . . and while the army was passing they came in and took our bread, pie, milk, cheese, meat dishes, cups, spoons, and then took shirts, sheets, blankets, coverleds, stodking, breeches. . . . ”
Job Whitall, Nov 21, 1777

The Forts at Province Island and Red Bank have been defended with a Magnanimity, which will give our Country a Reputation in Europe.”
John Adams to Abigail Adams

The once lush Whitall farm lay in ruins following the battle. Decimated orchards, unmarked graves, and blood-stained floors remained stark reminders of the price of war.

In November, Fort Mifflin fell to the British and the Americans abandoned Fort Mercer. British forces lay waste to what was left of the fort and pillaged the Whitall home for supplies. It would not be until the spring of 1778 that the Whitall family could begin rebuilding their business and their lives.

Despite the ultimate abandonment of Fort Mercer, the victory at Red Bank was significant for two reasons: 1) It allowed Washington’s forces the necessary time to establish camp at Valley Forge; 2) The victory persuaded the French to enter the war on the side of the Americans.

James Whitall never forgave the Americans for their
The Aftermath Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
2. The Aftermath Marker
actions on his property. He petitioned the New Jersey legislature for reimbursement – reimbursement which never came.
 
Erected 2015 by New Jersey Historical Commission.
 
Location. 39° 52.19′ N, 75° 11.432′ W. Marker is in National Park, New Jersey, in Gloucester County. Marker can be reached from Hessian Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is on the Red Bank Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: National Park NJ 08063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Whitall House (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Red Bank Battlefield Park! (within shouting distance of this marker); Ann Cooper Whitall (within shouting distance of this marker); The Medicinal Garden (within shouting distance of this marker); James and Ann Whitall House (within shouting distance of this marker); Operations on the Delaware (within shouting distance of this marker); National Park Armed Service Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Naval Engagement (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in National Park.
 
More about this marker. A map of the Plan of attack on the Fort of Red Bank appears
Marker on the Red Bank Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
3. Marker on the Red Bank Battlefield
at the upper left of the marker. It includes a caption of “This map shows how close the Whitall plantation was to two forts: Mercer and Mifflin. After the Hessians failed to take Fort Mercer, the crown turned its attention to Fort Mifflin which faced one of the heaviest bombardments of the war.”
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Inside the Whitall House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 27, 2013
4. Inside the Whitall House
After the battle, the injured men, mostly Hessians, were carried to the Whithall House, which served as a field hospital for several weeks.
Whitall House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2015
5. Whitall House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 158 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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