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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Shreve & Co.

A San Francisco Institution since 1852.

 
 
Shreve & Co. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2008
1. Shreve & Co. Marker
Inscription. From the time of the Gold Rush, Shreve & Co. has been the premier jeweler in the city, first making its home in this building in March 1906. This was one of the only structures to survive The Great Earthquake of April 18, 1906.

It was here that Shreve & Co. exhibited the 720 carat Yonkers diamond, the jewelry of Catherine the Great of Russia and created the State of California’s coronation gift to Queen Elizabeth II of England.

And it is here that this unique history lives on today—a San Francisco landmark where high standards are traditional.
 
Erected by Shreve & Co.
 
Location. 37° 47.327′ N, 122° 24.323′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is at the intersection of Post Street and Grant Avenue on Post Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Post Street, San Francisco CA 94108, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “The D’Arcy Building” (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line);
Shreve & Co. - street level view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2008
2. Shreve & Co. - street level view
Marker is visible to the right of the door beneath the building awning.
Mayors of San Francisco (about 500 feet away); Home Telephone Company (about 500 feet away); Luisa Tetrazzini (about 700 feet away); The Mechanics’ Institute (about 700 feet away); Dewey Monument (about 700 feet away); Pacific States Building (about 700 feet away); SFFD Engine Co. No. 2 (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
Regarding Shreve & Co.. George and Samuel Shreve opened the doors of their first jewelry store in San Francisco in 1852, specializing in high quality silver of their own crafting. At some later point they located their store on Market Street, opposite the Grand Palace Hotel. In March 1906, they located to the present location in a building especially designed and built for the company. Fortunately, the building incorporated relatively advanced (for the time) anti-quake
Shreve and Co. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 18, 2015
3. Shreve and Co.
with picture plaque
engineering technology, which allowed the 9-story building to survive the April 1906 earthquake.

The great fire subequent to the quake hit the area hard, incinerating much of the surviving building. Fortunately, between the quake and the fire, quick-witted store employees had put all of the the store's stock in the building vault. The vault and its contents survived the fire, and consequently, so did the company.

The company temporarily relocated to Oakland for two years while their building was rebuilt. During WW I, the company's silversmiths switched production from luxury goods to making airplane parts for the US government, although after the war they returned to their former trade. The firm ceased being family-owned in 1967, when the company was sold to the Dayton-Hudson Corporation. Silver manufacturing stopped then, although the company continues today in the retailing of fine jewelry.
 
Also see . . .  Shreve & Co. History. Shreve & Co. provides history and photographs of their company and building. The post-quake photos are particularly interesting. (Submitted on July 14, 2008.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarks
 
Corner of Grant and Post image. Click for full size.
4. Corner of Grant and Post
In the Early 1900s, before the Shreve Building.
Close-up of photo on display in the Shreve Building
Shreve Building Under Construction<br> image. Click for full size.
April 5, 1905
5. Shreve Building Under Construction
Close-up of photo on display in the Shreve Building
Shreve Building Under Construction image. Click for full size.
June 7, 1905
6. Shreve Building Under Construction
Close-up of photo on display in the Shreve Building
Shreve Building, San Francisco, Calif. image. Click for full size.
circa 1905
7. Shreve Building, San Francisco, Calif.
Shreve & Co. Building image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2008
8. Shreve & Co. Building
Completed in early 1906, its anti-quake engineering allowed it to survive the Great Earthquake and Fire of April 18, 1906.
Salvaging the Vaults image. Click for full size.
Collection of Milton S. Ray
9. Salvaging the Vaults
The caption reads: "Salvaging operations after the fire. Opening the vaults of Shreve & Company, jewelers, before the ruins of their store at Post Street and Grant Avenue."
From the book San Fransisco Since 1872, A Pictorial History of Seven Decades by Oscar Lewis with photographs from the collection of Milton S. Ray (Published by the Ray Oil Burner Company, San Francisco, 1946)
Shreve and Co. has moved. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 18, 2015
10. Shreve and Co. has moved.
We're now at 117 Post St. next to Gumps.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 14, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 3,672 times since then and 79 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week July 20, 2008. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 14, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on November 28, 2015, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   8. submitted on July 14, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   9. submitted on September 20, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   10. submitted on November 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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