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Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, Meuse, France
 

Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery

 
 
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
1. Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Dedicated to the memory of those who died for their country.
 
Erected by American Battle Monument Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 49° 20.028′ N, 5° 5.628′ E. Marker is in Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, Meuse. Marker is on Rue du General Pershing (D123). Touch for map. The inscription is above the main entrance to the Cemetery building. Marker is in this post office area: Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, Meuse 55110, France.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 16 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Montfaucon American Monument (approx. 7.7 kilometers away in Lorraine); Pennsylvania Memorial at Varennes en Argonne (approx. 12.8 kilometers away in Lorraine); Lost Battalion (approx. 15.9 kilometers away in Champagne-Ardenne); Deutscher Soldatenfriedhof Consenvoye (approx. 15.9 kilometers away in Lorraine).
 
Also see . . .  Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery - Wikipedia. (Submitted on January 12, 2016, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. War, World I
 
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
2. Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery
The main building is at the top of the ramp.
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
3. Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery
View from the steps of the main building to the cemetery.
Erwin R. Bleckley-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
4. Erwin R. Bleckley-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *BLECKLEY, ERWIN R. Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps, 130th Field Artillery, observer 50th Aero Squadron, Air Service Place and date. Near Binarville, France, 6 October 1918 (Air Mission) Entered service at: Wichita, Kans. G.O. No.: 56, W.D., 1922 Citation: 2d Lt. Bleckley, with his pilot, 1st Lt. Harold E. Goettler, Air Service, left the airdrome late in the afternoon on their second trip to drop supplies to a battalion of the 77th Division, which had been cut off by the enemy in the Argonne Forest. Having been subjected on the first trip to violent fire from the enemy, they attempted on the second trip to come still lower in order to get the packages even more precisely on the designated spot. In the course of his mission the plane was brought down by enemy rifle and machinegun fire from the ground, resulting in fatal wounds to 2d Lt. Bleckley, who died before he could be taken to a hospital. In attempting and performing this mission 2d Lt. Bleckley showed the highest possible contempt of personal danger, devotion to duty, courage, and valor.
Marcellus H. Chiles-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
5. Marcellus H. Chiles-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *CHILES, MARCELLUS H. Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Army, 356th Infantry, 89th Division Place and date: Near Le Champy Bas, France, 3 November 1918 Entered service at: Denver, Colo. G.O. No.: 20, W.D., 1919 Citation: When his battalion, of which he had just taken command, was halted by machinegun fire from the front and left flank, he picked up the rifle of a dead soldier and, calling on his men to follow led the advance across a stream, waist deep, in the face of the machinegun fire. Upon reaching the opposite bank this gallant officer was seriously wounded in the abdomen by a sniper, but before permitting himself to be evacuated he made complete arrangements for turning over his command to the next senior officer, and under the inspiration of his fearless leadership his battalion reached its objective. Capt. Chiles died shortly after reaching the hospital.
Matej Kocak-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
6. Matej Kocak-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *KOCAK, MATEJ Army Medal Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 66th Company, 5th Regiment, 2d Division Place and date: Near Soissons, France, 18 July 1918 Entered service at: New York, N.Y. G.O. No.: 34, W.D., 1919 Citation: When the advance of his battalion was checked by a hidden machinegun nest, he went forward alone, unprotected by covering fire from his own men, and worked in between the German positions in the face of fire from enemy covering detachments. Locating the machinegun nest, he rushed it and with his bayonet drove off the crew. Shortly after this he organized 25 French colonial soldiers who had become separated from their company and led them in attacking another machinegun nest, which was also put out of action
Frank Luke, Jr. Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
7. Frank Luke, Jr. Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *LUKE, FRANK, JR. Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps, 27th Aero Squadron, 1st Pursuit Group, Air Service Place and date: Near Murvaux, France, 29 September 1918 (Air Mission) Entered service at: Phoenix, Ariz. G.O. No.: 59, W.D., 1919 Citation: After having previously destroyed a number of enemy aircraft within 17 days he voluntarily started on a patrol after German observation balloons. Though pursued by 8 German planes which were protecting the enemy balloon line, he unhesitatingly attacked and shot down in flames 3 German balloons, being himself under heavy fire from ground batteries and the hostile planes. Severely wounded, he descended to within 50 meters of the ground, and flying at this low altitude near the town of Murvaux opened fire upon enemy troops, killing 6 and wounding as many more. Forced to make a landing and surrounded on all sides by the enemy, who called upon him to surrender, he drew his automatic pistol and defended himself gallantly until he fell dead from a wound in the chest.
Oscar F. Miller-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
8. Oscar F. Miller-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *MILLER, OSCAR F. Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Army, 361st Infantry, 91st Division Place and date: Near Gesnes, France, 28 September 1918 Entered service at: Los Angeles, Calif. G.O. No.: 16, W.D. 1919 Citation: After 2 days of intense physical and mental strain, during which Maj. Miller had led his battalion in the front line of the advance through the forest of Argonne, the enemy was met in a prepared position south of Gesnes. Though almost exhausted, he energetically reorganized his battalion and ordered an attack. Upon reaching open ground the advancing line began to waver in the face of machinegun fire from the front and flanks and direct artillery fire. Personally leading his command group forward between his front-line companies, Maj. Miller inspired his men by his personal courage, and they again pressed on toward the hostile position. As this officer led the renewed attack he was shot in the right leg, but he nevertheless staggered forward at the head of his command. Soon afterwards he was again shot in the right arm, but he continued the charge, personally cheering his troops on through the heavy machinegun fire. Just before the objective was reached he received a wound in the abdomen, which forced him to the ground, but he continued to urge his men on, telling them to push on to the next ridge and leave him where he lay. He died from his wounds a few days later.
Harold W. Roberts-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
9. Harold W. Roberts-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *ROBERTS, HAROLD W. Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army Company A, 344th Battalion, Tank Corps Place and date: In the Montrebeau Woods France 4 October 1918 Entered service at: San Francisco, Calif. G.O. No.: 16, W.D., 1919 Citation: Cpl. Roberts, a tank driver, was moving his tank into a clump of bushes to afford protection to another tank which had become disabled. The tank slid into a shell hole, 10 feet deep, filled with water, and was immediately submerged. Knowing that only 1 of the 2 men in the tank could escape, Cpl. Roberts said to the gunner, "Well, only one of us can get out, and out you go," whereupon he pushed his companion through the back door of the tank and was himself drowned.
William Sawelson-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
10. William Sawelson-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *SAWELSON, WILLIAM Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company M, 312th Infantry, 78th Division Place and date: At Grand-Pre, France, 26 October, 1918 Entered service at: Harrison, N.J. G.O. No.: 16, W.D., 1919 Citation: Hearing a wounded man in a shell hole some distance away calling for water, Sgt. Sawelson, upon his own initiative, left shelter and crawled through heavy machinegun fire to where the man lay, giving him what water he had in his canteen. He then went back to his own shell hole, obtained more water, and was returning to the wounded man when he was killed by a machinegun bullet.
Fred E. Smith-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
11. Fred E. Smith-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *SMITH, FRED E. Rank and organization: Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army, 308th Infantry, 77th Division Place and date: Near Binarville, France, 29 September 1918 Entered service at: Bartlett, N. Dak. G.O. NO.: 49, W.D., 1922 Citation: When communication from the forward regimental post of command to the battalion leading the advance had been interrupted temporarily by the infiltration of small parties of the enemy armed with machineguns, Lt. Col. Smith personally led a party of 2 other officers and 10 soldiers, and went forward to reestablish runner posts and carry ammunition to the front line. The guide became confused and the party strayed to the left flank beyond the outposts of supporting troops, suddenly coming under fire from a group of enemy machineguns only 50 yards away. Shouting to the other members of his party to take cover this officer, in disregard of his danger, drew his pistol and opened fire on the German guncrew. About this time he fell, severely wounded in the side, but regaining his footing, he continued to fire on the enemy until most of the men in his party were out of danger. Refusing first-aid treatment he then made his way in plain view of the enemy to a handgrenade dump and returned under continued heavy machinegun fire for the purpose of making another attack on the enemy emplacements. As he was attempting to ascertain the exact location of the nearest nest, he again fell, mortally wounded.
Freddie Stowers-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 30, 2008
12. Freddie Stowers-Medal of Honor Recipient World War I
He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *STOWERS, FREDDIE Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company C, 371st Infantry Regiment, 93d Division Citation: Corporal Stowers, distinguished himself by exceptional heroism on 28 September 1918 while serving as a squad leader in Company C, 371st Infantry Regiment, 93d Division. His company was the lead company during the attack on Hill 188, Champagne Marne Sector, France, during World War I. A few minutes after the attack began, the enemy ceased firing and began climbing up onto the parapets of the trenches, holding up their arms as if wishing to surrender. The enemy's actions caused the American forces to cease fire and to come out into the open. As the company started forward and when within about 100 meters of the trench line, the enemy jumped back into their trenches and greeted Corporal Stowers' company with interlocking bands of machine gun fire and mortar fire causing well over fifty percent casualties. Faced with incredible enemy resistance, Corporal Stowers took charge, setting such a courageous example of personal bravery and leadership that he inspired his men to follow him in the attack. With extraordinary heroism and complete disregard of personal danger under devastating fire, he crawled forward leading his squad toward an enemy machine gun nest, which was causing heavy casualties to his company. After fierce fighting, the machine gun position was destroyed and the enemy soldiers were killed. Displaying great courage and intrepidity Corporal Stowers continued to press the attack against a determined enemy. While crawling forward and urging his men to continue the attack on a second trench line, he was gravely wounded by machine gun fire. Although Corporal Stowers was mortally wounded, he pressed forward, urging on the members of his squad, until he died. Inspired by the heroism and display of bravery of Corporal Stowers, his company continued the attack against incredible odds, contributing to the capture of Hill 188 and causing heavy enemy casualties. Corporal Stowers' conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism, and supreme devotion to his men were well above and beyond the call of duty, follow the finest traditions of military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 11, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 280 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 12, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 11, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   7, 8. submitted on January 12, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on January 13, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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