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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Collinsville in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Constitution Oak

 
 
Constitution Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 31, 2015
1. Constitution Oak Marker
Inscription.
Commemorating Connecticutís 1902
Constitutional Convention
Presented to
Collins Co. President E.H. Sears
Canton Delegate

 
Erected 2015.
 
Location. 41° 49.37′ N, 72° 54.717′ W. Marker is in Collinsville, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is on Maple Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 66 Maple Avenue, Canton CT 06019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 0.7 miles away); In Memory of Phoebe Humphrey (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Collinsville, Town of Canton (approx. 0.8 miles away); Canton Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away); Canton (approx. 0.9 miles away); Charter Oak Offspring (approx. one mile away); Collinsville- Railroad from both sides (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Collinsville.
 
Regarding Constitution Oak. The Constitution Oak was named to commemorate the constitutional convention held in Hartford,
One of 74 remaining Constitution Oaks image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 31, 2015
2. One of 74 remaining Constitution Oaks
Of the original 168 Constitution Oaks planted in Connecticut, this one remains, even though it is located next to a busy road and very close to power lines. It is a pin oak tree. The offspring of the Charter Oaks are white oaks.
Connecticut in 1902. At this time, each town had 2 representatives in the General Assembly. The purpose of this convention was to change Connecticutís constitution to provide proportional representation for each of itís towns. A town with a larger population would have more representatives. The proposal was voted down. To remember this constitutional convention, pin oak seedlings were given to each of the delegates from the 168 towns in Connecticut. In 2002, 74 are still growing.
 
Also see . . .
1. Connecticut history of the Constitution Oak. (Submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Connecticut's notable trees. (Submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Wolcott's Constitution Oak. (Submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryPolitics
 
A new team. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 31, 2015
3. A new team.
Life Time Family Dentistry has preserved Cantonís Constitution Oak. It is a great symbol for their business: great roots, straight growth, & no major cavities for over 100 years. Itís history saved it from an extraction suggested by the electric utility.
The oak in Cantonís town seal image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, December 31, 2015
4. The oak in Cantonís town seal
It could be the Charter Oak or it could be the Constitution Oak. They are both alive and well in Canton, Connecticut.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 264 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 1, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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