Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Mary’s City in St. Mary's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Commemorating Maryland’s Pride and Glory

“Freedom of Conscience”

 
 
Commemorating Maryland’s Pride and Glory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 31, 2007
1. Commemorating Maryland’s Pride and Glory Marker
Marker is on the walkway behind the statue.
Inscription. In the early 1880s, Marylanders began to commemorate the “lost city” of St. Mary’s as a place of special significance. The 300th anniversary of Maryland’s founding in 1934 brought renewed attention and enthusiasm. The State House replica was built, a huge celebration drawing over 100,000 people was held, and this statue was commissioned. It honors religious toleration, a right secured to all citizens of Maryland by “An Act Concerning Religion,” passed by the General Assembly in 1649.

This statue was paid for by donations from various counties in the state. It is graced by a garden, redesigned in 2000 as a community project. The “BayScapes” garden embodies the concept of environmentally sound landscaping developed by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay. By relying heavily on native species that do not require pesticides, fertilizers or supplemental watering, this garden benefits people, wildlife, the St. Mary’s River, and ultimately the Bay.

The garden is sponsored by St. Mary’s College of Maryland, the Historic St. Mary’s City Commission, St. Mary’s Parish, the Governor’s Lower Potomac Tributary Team, the Mistress Brent Garden Club, and the Maryland State Highway Administration. Financial support was provided by Andros, Inc. and the St. Mary’s County Critical Area Commission.

(caption)
“Freedom of Conscience”<br>by Hans Schuler, Sr. image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 31, 2007
2. “Freedom of Conscience”
by Hans Schuler, Sr.
The statue was erected in May, 1935. Click on image to enlarge to examine detail.
Hans Schuler, Sr. (1874–1951) a Baltimore sculptor, created this statue. In his words, it “represents the liberation of the spirit that had for so long been bound by intolerance. ... The torch represents the flame that kindled this fire of religious freedom throughout the world.”

(sidebar) “No man who repairth thither is a Christian in danger of being disturbed for his religion.” —John Ogilby, 1671.

(sidebar) The Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) is the state flower and represents the black and gold family colors of the Calverts, the founders of Maryland. Its perennial version, Rudbeckia Fulgida, is planted here.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland, Saint Mary's City marker series.
 
Location. 38° 11.307′ N, 76° 25.968′ W. Marker is in St. Mary’s City, Maryland, in St. Mary's County. Marker is on Trinity Church Road west of Point Lookout Road (Maryland Route 5), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Marys City MD 20686, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Mary’s Female Seminary (a few steps from this marker); Saint Mary’s Female Seminary (about 600 feet away, measured
“Freedom of Conscience” Detail image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 31, 2007
3. “Freedom of Conscience” Detail
in a direct line); After the Disastrous Fire (about 600 feet away); Sharing Land and Legacy (about 700 feet away); Governing (about 700 feet away); The St. Mary’s Chapel (about 700 feet away); Trinity Church, St. Mary’s Parish (about 800 feet away); Here Lyeth The Body (approx. 0.2 miles away); Leonard Calvert (approx. 0.2 miles away); Entrance to First State House of Maryland (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Mary’s City.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicHorticulture & ForestryLandmarksPeaceSettlements & Settlers
 
Back of Statue image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 31, 2007
4. Back of Statue
“A gift to the State of Maryland from the Counties to commemorate the 300th anniversary of its founding, 1634–1934.”
Detail from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 31, 2007
5. Detail from Marker
You are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
6. You are Here
The 1934 Tercentenary Celebration at St. Mary's City, looking south, The statue was erected in May, 1935, at the location of the red dot.
Close-up of photo on marker
1934 Medallion image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
7. 1934 Medallion
Also designed by Hans Schuler, this medallion represents the landing of the Maryland colonists in 1634.
Close-up of photo on marker
Hans Schuler image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
8. Hans Schuler
Hans Schuler, Sr. (1874–1951) a Baltimore sculptor, created this statue. In his words, it “represents the liberation of the spirit that had for so long been bound by intolerance. … The torch represents the flame that kindled this fire of religious freedom throughout the world.”
Close-up of photo on marker
Freedom of Conscience image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
9. Freedom of Conscience
Sculpture by Hans Schuler
Freedom of Conscience image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
10. Freedom of Conscience
Sculpture by Hans Schuler
Freedom of Conscience image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
11. Freedom of Conscience
Sculpture by Hans Schuler
Schuler image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 11, 2015
12. Schuler
Hans Schuler's signature on the Freedom of Conscience Monument.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 20, 2007, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,420 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 20, 2007, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on March 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Long shot of the statue as seen from the highway • Photos of the garden • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement