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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Midville in Burke County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bark Camp Church

 
 
Bark Camp Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Bark Camp Church Marker
Inscription.
Constituted in 1788, Bark Camp Church was the center for worship, culture and hospitality in Bark Camp, one of the oldest settlements in Burke County.

Many of the congregation honorably served during the War Between the States as soldiers and as members of the Ladies Volunteer Association.

General Sherman's 17th Army Corps encamped at Bark Camp Church in December 1864.

United Daughters of the Confederacy®
Emanuel Rangers Chapter No. 2318

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Shermans March to the Sea, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 32° 53′ N, 82° 12.41′ W. Marker is in Midville, Georgia, in Burke County. Marker can be reached from Bark Camp Church Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Located approximately 300 yards west from Ga Highway 56. Marker is in this post office area: Midville GA 30441, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Bark Camp Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sherman at Midville (approx. 4.7 miles away); Sherman at the Jones Plantation (approx. 5.4 miles away); Old Town Plantation
Bark Camp Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2011
2. Bark Camp Church and Marker
Gone are the sights and sounds of regular worship, but Bark Camp Church building, in all its dignity, graces still the rustling woodlands surrounding it. It is hoped that the old building through special worship events and an endless visitation of descendants, friends and strangers, will speak to those who come and go about the great God who gave her birth and shaped her heritage. This is the answer for those who helped restore Bark Camp's stately building and cemetery, and as we continue to preserve this heritage for future generations to enjoy and reflect upon. ( Bark Camp History)
(approx. 6.3 miles away); Pine Barren Crossroads (approx. 7.2 miles away); Old Savannah Road (was approx. 7.2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Summerville (approx. 10.4 miles away); Battle of Buck Head Creek (approx. 10.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Midville.
 
Regarding Bark Camp Church. History Of Bark Camp Church ~

The Bark Camp Church probably got its name from a small settlement located three miles east of the present building near the Jenkins County line and on the east side of what became Bark Camp Creek. Hardy souls were in this area as early as 1740 hunting and grazing cattle on Indian land. For temporary shelter pioneers would construct lean-to type shelters and
cover them with bark, a method learned from the Indians, hence bark camp. The present location of the church came to be called Bark Camp Crossroads. At least four roads came together in front of the church. The main road in front of the building went from Birdsville to Louisville. That is why the church is facing south. Bark Camp Crossroads boasted the second oldest Post Office in the State of Georgia after Birdsville.

After
Bark Camp Church streetside, seen along Bark Camp Church Road image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2011
3. Bark Camp Church streetside, seen along Bark Camp Church Road
the Indian Treaty of 1763 people began to move into this area in substantial numbers, including well-to-do planters that eventually developed large plantations. The Bark Camp Baptist Church, located four miles north of Midville, Georgia on Highway 56, was organized in the early part of 1788, even before George Washington was elected president. It was a
center of worship, culture and hospitality in one of the oldest settlements in Burke County. Many wealthy plantation owners were among the early members.

The church began with twenty-nine charter members that included Silas Scarbore, its first pastor, Zebulon Cock and John Allen, who were its first deacons. Zebulon Cock gave the first plot of land. The congregation has built four houses of worship. The first was made of round logs (probable with the bark left on) followed by a hewn log and clapboard buildings.

Moses Fuller constructed the fourth and present building in the spring of 1847 at the cost of $1,700. His wife, Laura, erected a fairly large marker in the cemetery in memory of Mr. Fuller. Charles A. Burton gave the church four acres and sold an additional four acres for $25 for the stately edifice. In 1848 two chairs, a sofa and a communion table were purchased for the new church. The beautiful pulpit Bible was given to the church by Mrs. Adelaide Sneed. The original communion set was probably given
Bark Camp Church Pulpit image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2011
4. Bark Camp Church Pulpit
to the young congregation at its early inception. We have the communion set, the old Bible and a copy of the membership roll and minuets dating back to the year 1823. The earliest records are lost to posterity.

Prominent names among the membership include: Bunns, Murphees, Nasworthys, Jones, Knights, Holtons, Inmans,
Burtons, Grubbs, Crosses, Netherlands, Robinsons, Skinners, Colemans, Hicksons, Smith and many others. Jonathan Coleman, a Revolutionary War Veteran, and charter member of the church is buried in the cemetery.

It is documented that Bark Camp Church was visited by Sherman’s raiders in Dec. of 1864.

Bark Camp Church was a powerful force for God for 170 years before its doors closed in 1958. Families in the community moved away and the younger generation went to college and never returned. From that 18th century beginning the church grew through the years to serve Burke County and beyond. It was instrumental in organizing Hephzibah Baptist Association and delegates were sent to Augusta in May of 1845 to help form the Southern Baptist Convention. From the Bark Camp Church came, either directly or indirectly churches such as: Midville, Rosier, Hines, Hawhammock, Summertown, and Bark Camp Baptist Church on McGruder Road.

Gone are the sights and sounds of regular worship, but the Bark Camp Church building, in all its dignity, graces
Dr. Young John Allen Tribute, inside image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2011
5. Dr. Young John Allen Tribute, inside
Methodist Missionary to China, 1860-1907
Born January 3, 1836, Burke Co., GA. Died May 30, 1907, Shanghi, China. Graduated Emory College, 1858. Recieved Doctor of Laws degree, Emory College, 1878. President of Anglo-Chinese College, Shanghai, 1885-1895. Founded Mc Tyeire Home and School for Girls, Shanghai, 1892. Founded and edited the first Chinese newspaper, Review of the Times. Author of 250 volumes of original and translated tretises. Superintendent of Missions, China, for Methodist Episcopal Church South. Preached at Bark Camp Church on Sunday, June 30, 1878.
Donated by: Jerry A. Maddox, Atlanta, GA, 2005
Presented April 19, 2008
still the rustling woodlands surrounding it. It is hoped that the old building through special worship events and an endless visitation of descendants, friends, and strangers, will yet speak to those who come and go about the great God who gave her birth and shaped her heritage. This is the answer for those who helped restore Bark Camp’s stately building and
cemetery, and as we continue to preserve this heritage for future generations to enjoy and reflect upon.

After the restoration of Bank Camp Church building and cemetery in 2004, we have organized a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization with elected officials and hold our annual meeting the 3rd Saturday of April at 11 a.m. We have a speaker, business session, dinner on the picnic tables underneath the giant oak trees, and a fund-raising auction. The money raised at the auction goes into a special account for perpetual care for our cemetery. It is our goal to raise $20,000 for
perpetual care of the cemetery. We will gladly accept donations and would greatly appreciate being remembered in your will.

History sketch written by Rev. Leonard Quick, who was the driving force organizing the restoration of old Bark Camp Church. Mr. Quick and his family were members of the church in the late 40s and 50s, He was ordained as a Baptist minister at Bark Camp in November 1953. After his retirement and moving back home
Bark Camp Church History image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2011
6. Bark Camp Church History
and saw the condition of the cemetery and church the restoration process soon began.
 
Also see . . .  Bark Camp Baptist Church. According to Albert Hillhouse’s history of Burke County, the Bark Camp community was an early settlement that developed around “an original camp site for itinerant cattlemen. . . . A ‘bark camp’ was a crude, bark-covered lean-to which Indians taught early settlers to make.” A nearby creek carried the same name. (Submitted on July 12, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Bark Camp Church Cemetery nearby image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2011
7. Bark Camp Church Cemetery nearby
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 11, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 863 times since then and 69 times this year. Last updated on August 19, 2016, by Harry Gatzke of Huntsville, Alabama. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 11, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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