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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Troy in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church

 
 
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
1. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church Marker
Inscription. 4.5 miles northwest is Long Cane Church. Organized in 1771 as Associate Presbyterian, with the Rev. William Ronaldson as first stated supply. It united with Cedar Springs, March 7, 1786, under Dr. Thos. Clark; withdrew Sept. 15, 1808; part of congregation under the Presbyterian Church, 1818-1819; all reunited with Cedar Spring, Feb 28, 1828; withdrew, Jan. 18, 1892. The present building was dedicated, July 20, 1856.
 
Erected 1940 by members and friends of the church. (Marker Number 24-2.)
 
Location. 33° 59.261′ N, 82° 17.864′ W. Marker is in Troy, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker is on Main Street West near Twigg Street (South Carolina Highway 10). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Troy SC 29848, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Long Canes Massacre (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Long Canes Massacre (approx. 2.4 miles away); Badwell / Badwell Cemetery (approx. 4.4 miles away); Dorn Mill (approx. 5.2 miles away); Dornís Mill / Dorn Gold Mine (was approx. 5.2 miles
Long Cane Massacre and Long Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church Markers image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
2. Long Cane Massacre and Long Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church Markers
away but has been reported missing. ); McCormick County / MACK (approx. 5.2 miles away); Patrick H. Bradley (approx. 5.2 miles away); McCormick Train Station (approx. 5.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Troy.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lower Long Cane Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. (Submitted on July 22, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
2. National Register Information on Lower Long Cane Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The Lower Long Cane Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and Cemetery is associated with early settlement in the colonial and Revolutionary-era South Carolina backcountry and with the nineteenth-century establishment, decline, and revitalization of not only a single congregation, but also of the entire Associate Reformed Presbyterian denomination as a separate sect in the Presbyterian tradition. (Submitted on September 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Lower Long Cane ARP Cemetery Index. Current through 1978. (Submitted on September 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1.
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church - Rear Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
3. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church - Rear Entrance
This is the side facing the road.
Directions to Long Cane ARP Church

If traveling northeast on Highway 28 in McCormick County, South Carolina, turn to the right at SC Hwy 33-38 (the intersection with "Battle of Long Cane" Marker). Travel about three miles until the pavement ends. Turn to your left and continue on 33-38 until it turns into SC Hwy 33-36. The church will be on your right.
    — Submitted September 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Marker Style
The marker shown reflects the earliest style of South Carolina Historical Markers. It was in use between the 1930s and 1955s. The original design was cast aluminum and crowned with an encircled palmetto tree. The markers were painted silver with black lettering.
    — Submitted September 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church - Front Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
4. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church - Front Entrance
Note the four doors -- the two in the center (the larger) were for the whites. The two smaller doors (on the far ends of the atrium) were for slaves. The slave doors opened to a stairway which led to the balcony where they worshiped.
Slave's Staircase Leading to The Balcony image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
5. Slave's Staircase Leading to The Balcony
Long Cane ARP Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
6. Long Cane ARP Church Cemetery
Doors for the Races image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
7. Doors for the Races
Slaves entered through the smaller door to the left while whites used the larger double doors on the right. The ramp was added later.
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
8. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
9. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
10. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church
Long Cane ARP Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
11. Long Cane ARP Church Cemetery
Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church Memorial Stone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
12. Long Cane Associated Reformed Presbyterian Church Memorial Stone
Long Cane Associated Reformed Church

Organized 1771
Detail of Iron Fence Work Surrounding a Grave image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
13. Detail of Iron Fence Work Surrounding a Grave
Memorial to Mathew Brown image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
14. Memorial to Mathew Brown
In Memory
of
Mathew Brown
Martha Creswell Brown
Mary McGaw Brown
Immigrated from Ireland 1814
Died 1845
Erected by His Descendents
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 22, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,267 times since then and 49 times this year. Last updated on July 30, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 22, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on September 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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