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New York City in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cyrus West Field

Born Nov 30 1819 - Died July 12 1892

 
 
Cyrus West Field Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 3, 2016
1. Cyrus West Field Marker
Inscription. Here for forty years was his home and here the plans were made for the first transatlantic cable laid in 1858
 
Location. 40° 44.301′ N, 73° 59.121′ W. Marker is in New York City, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Lexington Avenue and Gramercy Park North, on the right when traveling south on Lexington Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Lexington Avenue, New York NY 10010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Brotherhood Synagogue (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Robert Henri (about 500 feet away); Lincoln Kirstein (about 600 feet away); Pirates of Penzance Composition Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace (approx. 0.2 miles away); Horace Greeley (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Rose Hill (approx. 0.2 miles away); Theodore Roosevelt (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York City.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located at the site of his residence, and not the actual residence - that building having been torn down and replaced with the current building.
 
Also see . . .  History of the Atlantic Cable & Undersea Communications (atlantic-cable.com)
Cyrus West Field Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 3, 2016
2. Cyrus West Field Marker - Wide View
The marker is visible here on the corner of the building.
. ...In 1854 Field began the quest to lay a telegraphic cable across the Atlantic Ocean. After several failed attempts, in August 1858 Field arranged for Queen Victoria to send the first transatlantic message to President James Buchanan, and New York erupted in celebrations, lauding Field, telegraph inventor Samuel F. B. Morse, modern technology, and American ingenuity in general. But the cable broke after just three weeks, and Field did not complete his project until 1866.... (Submitted on October 18, 2016.) 
 
Categories. Communications
 
Cyrus West Field image. Click for full size.
By Bain News Service, October 17, 2016
3. Cyrus West Field
Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.
<i>MUNICIPAL DINNER TO CYRUS W. FIELD,ESQ. [held by] METROPOLITAN HOTEL...</i> image. Click for full size.
1858
4. MUNICIPAL DINNER TO CYRUS W. FIELD,ESQ. [held by] METROPOLITAN HOTEL...
The schedule of toasts for the Municipal Dinner held in honor of the laying of the transatlantic cable. Image courtesy of the New York City Public Library digital collections. (Click on image to enlarge)
<i>The laying of the cable---John and Jonathan joining hands</i> image. Click for full size.
Baker & Godwin, Printers, New York (Image courtesy of the Library of Congress), 1858
5. The laying of the cable---John and Jonathan joining hands
A crude but engaging picture, celebrating the goodwill between Great Britain and the United States generated by the successful completion of the Atlantic telegraph cable between Newfoundland and Valentia Bay (Ireland). Laid by the American steamer "Niagara" and British steamer "Agamemnon" (which appear in the background of the print), the cable transmitted its first message on August 17, 1858. The artist shows Brother Jonathan (left) shaking hands with John Bull. The two figures stand on opposite shores, set against a stormy, lightning-streaked sky over a choppy sea. "Brother Jonathan: "Glad to grasp your hand, uncle John! I almost feel like calling you Father, and will if you improve upon acquaintance! May the feeling of Friendship . . . be like the electric current which now unites our lands, and links our destiny with yours! May our hearts always beat together; and with one pulse--one Purpose, of Peace and Good-Will, we yet shall see ALL NATIONS speaking our Language, blessed with our Liberty, and led by that spirit of Love and Justice which leads to the only true happiness and Glory of Nations!" John Bull: "Happy to see and greet you, Jonathan! You feel like 'bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh!' You have grown to be a tall and sturdy man--quite as big as your Father! Great times these, my boy! We won't think of quarreling any more. I have grown too wise for that; and I hope we will both agree to let by-gones be by-gones! Henceforth we treat each other as equals, and only strive which shall do most in making 'all the world and the rest of Mankind' (as one of your good old Presidents once said) realize 'How good and pleasant a thing it is for brethren to dwell together in unity.'" - Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 18, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 16, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 96 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 17, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   4, 5. submitted on October 18, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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