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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Swain County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Hands That Built

 
 
Hands That Built Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, October 19, 2016
1. Hands That Built Marker
Inscription. Nature forged the Great Smokies, but the hands of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) helped shape the national park we know today. During the 1930s, enrollment peaked as 4,300 men worked here, building roads, campgrounds, trails, and buildings. They also reared fish for stocking, fought fires, and practiced innumerable other trades. Their work remains an important part of the fabric of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The CCC was the first of several federal job programs designed to lift the nation out of the Great Depression. Created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933, the CCC employed three million men, most of them between 18 and 25 years old. Roosevelt declared their work "of moral and spiritual value, not only to those ... taking part, but to the rest of the country as well."

Left Photo Caption
CCC workers performed tasks ranging from the administrative to the backbreaking. Below, a CCC worked planes shingles, and a crew builds the bridge over Little River near Elkmont. Within Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Oconalufee Visitor Center, Rockefeller Memorial, and Park Headquarters near Gatlinburg are all enduring examples of the work of CCC stonemasons.

Right Photo Caption
Twenty-two CCC camps – each home to about 200 men – were
Hands That Built Marker (extreme right) with Roosevelt Memorial in left background. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, October 19, 2016
2. Hands That Built Marker (extreme right) with Roosevelt Memorial in left background.
built in the park. Each was commanded by an army officer, and camp life inevitably had military aspects (photo below). Most enrollees received $30.00 per month, of which $25.00 was mailed home.

Map Caption
(NP-X) Symbols indicate locations of CCC camps in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Camps were numbered sequentially, based upon the order in which they were established.

 
Erected by the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 35° 36.654′ N, 83° 25.5′ W. Marker is in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina, in Swain County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 441 north of Clingman's Dome Road. Touch for map. Located within the Newfound Gap parking area. Marker is in this post office area: Cherokee NC 28719, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Appalachian Trail (a few steps from this marker); Land of Diversity (a few steps from this marker in Tennessee); The Great Smokies (a few steps from this marker); People of the Mountains (within shouting distance of this marker); Rockefeller Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker in Tennessee); “To the free people of America” (within shouting distance of this marker); A Mountain Sanctuary (within shouting distance of this marker); Great Smoky Mountains National Park (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
Also see . . .
1. National Park Service story about the CCC & the Smoky Mountains. (Submitted on October 23, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on the Civilian Conservation Corps. (Submitted on October 23, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkGovernmentHorticulture & Forestry
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 23, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 23, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 148 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 23, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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