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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sheridan-Kalorama in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes

 
 
Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 17, 2016
1. Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Marker
Inscription.
2223 R Street
Site of Residence
of
Charles Evans Hughes
Chief Justice of the United States
Plaque erected under the auspices of the
Columbia Historical Society
and
The Bar Association of
The District of Columbia

 
Erected by Columbia Historical Society and The Bar Association of the District of Columbia.
 
Location. 38° 54.764′ N, 77° 2.986′ W. Marker is in Sheridan-Kalorama, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on R Street, NW, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. The building is the Embassy of Myanmar. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2223 R Street, NW, Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Arts in Sheridan-Kalorama (within shouting distance of this marker); Eleftherios Venizelos (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Alberto Santos-Dumont (about 300 feet away); Philip H. Sheridan (about 300 feet away); Assassination of Orlando Letelier and Ronni K. Moffitt (about 400 feet away); Dr. Philip Jaisohn, 1864-1951 (about
Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 17, 2016
2. Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Marker
The building is to the right here in this view. The marker is to the left of the black and white door. To the right is a plaque indicating that the building is currently the Embassy of Myanmar.
500 feet away); The Gilded Age (about 500 feet away); Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (1881-1938) (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sheridan-Kalorama.
 
Also see . . .  Charles Evans Hughes. Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was an American statesman, lawyer, and Republican politician from New York. He served as the 36th Governor of New York (1907–1910), Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1910–1916), United States Secretary of State (1921–1925), a judge on the Court of International Justice (1928–1930), and the 11th Chief Justice of the United States (1930–1941). He was the Republican nominee in the 1916 U.S. Presidential election, losing narrowly to incumbent President Woodrow Wilson.

Hughes was a professor in the 1890s, a staunch supporter of Britain's New Liberalism, an important leader of the Progressive movement of the 20th century, a leading diplomat and New York lawyer in the days of Harding and Coolidge, and was known for being a swing voter when dealing with cases related to the New Deal in the 1930s. He has been hailed as a leading American conservative.
(Submitted on November 3, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.)
Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes image. Click for full size.
By George Prince, 1908
3. Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes
Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Reading Room (Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-22472)
 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Charles Evans Hughes 1862-1948 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2015
4. Charles Evans Hughes 1862-1948
This 1921 painting of Charles Evans Hughes by Philip Alexius de László hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Twice a member of the Supreme Court, Charles Evans Hughes was first appointed an associate justice in 1910 but resigned in 1916 to accept the Republican nomination for president. After his narrow defeat, he returned to private law practice until 1921, when he was named secretary of state in Warren G. Harding's administration. With the Senate's rejection of the Treaty of Versailles the year before, Hughes helped forge a separate treaty with Germany, formally ending the war between the two countries. He also called a conference in Washington for the limitation of international armaments. By the time of his resignation in 1925, Hughes had given greater definition to the Monroe Doctrine and improved the quality of the U.S. Foreign Service. In 1930, Hughes was nominated again to the high court, this time as Chief Justice.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 260 times since then and 58 times this year. Last updated on November 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 3, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   4. submitted on November 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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