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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seattle in King County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Start of Seattle Fire Site

 
 
Start of Seattle Fire Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 24, 2016
1. Start of Seattle Fire Site Marker
Inscription.
The Seattle Fire
started here on
June 6, 1889

——————————
This tablet was placed
by Survivors
of the Seattle Volunteer Fire Department

 
Erected by The Survivors of the Seattle Volunteer Fire Department.
 
Location. 47° 36.271′ N, 122° 20.177′ W. Marker is in Seattle, Washington, in King County. Marker is at the intersection of 1st Avenue and Madison Street, on the right when traveling south on 1st Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 909 1st Avenue, Seattle WA 98104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Post Office in Seattle (within shouting distance of this marker); Alexis Hotel / Globe Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Colman Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Holyoke Building (about 300 feet away); Burke Building Remnants (about 400 feet away); Exchange Building (about 400 feet away); First School in Seattle (about 700 feet away); Everett G. DuPen (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Seattle.
 
Also see . . .
Start of Seattle Fire Site Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 24, 2016
2. Start of Seattle Fire Site Marker - Wide View
The top of the marker is visible here just peeking above the bushes. The larger plaque above it indicates that the site is a Washington State Registered State Historic Place, but provides no other information (and so is not entered as a separate entry).

1. Great Seattle Fire (Wikipedia). The Great Seattle Fire was a fire that destroyed the entire central business district of Seattle, Washington, on June 6, 1889. The fire burned for several hours, destroying 25 blocks and causing as much as $20 million in damage ($527 million in today's dollars). As a result of the fire, streets in the Pioneer Square neighborhood in Seattle were elevated 22 feet (6.7 m) above the pre-fire street level and new buildings made of wood were banned. (Submitted on November 15, 2016.) 

2. Seattle burns down in the Great Fire on June 6, 1889 (HistoryLink.org, Walt Crowley). At about 2:30 p.m. on June 6, 1889, a pot of glue bursts into flames in Victor Clairmont's basement cabinet shop at the corner of Front (1st Avenue) and Madison streets. Efforts to contain the fire fail and it quickly engulfs the wood-frame building. Thanks to a dry spring and a brisk wind, the flames spread, and volunteer firefighters tap out the town's inadequate, privately owned watermains. By sunset, some 64 acres lie in smoldering ruins. This event is known as Seattle's Great Fire. (Submitted on November 15, 2016.) 

3. The Great Seattle Fire of 1889 (Seattle Municipal Archives). (Submitted on November 15, 2016.)
 
Categories. Disasters
 
Start of Seattle Fire Site Marker - Wider View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 24, 2016
3. Start of Seattle Fire Site Marker - Wider View
The marker site is visible here at the corner of the USPS Building.
Seattle's <i>Great Fire 1889 - Looking south down Front Street (now 1st Avenue) from Spring Street</i> image. Click for full size.
Boyd and Braas (image courtesy of the Seattle Municipal Archives), June 6, 1889
4. Seattle's Great Fire 1889 - Looking south down Front Street (now 1st Avenue) from Spring Street
The Great Fire of June 6, 1889 was a significant turning point in Seattle's history and changed both the physical and political landscapes of the City. The fire started at 2:30 p.m. in a paint and woodwork shop at Front and Madison and over the course of the next 18 hours swept a southward across 100 acres of Seattle's business district and waterfront. The fire left little standing in its wake, consuming buildings, docks, wooden sidewalks, and anything else combustible. Losses from the conflagration were estimated at $20 million. - Seattle Municipal Archives
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 15, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 112 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 15, 2016, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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