Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Eglin AFB in Okaloosa County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

UH-1 Iroquois

 
 
UH-1 Iroquois Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 26, 2017
1. UH-1 Iroquois Marker
Inscription.
The most widely used military, the Bell UH-1 series Iroquois, better known as the "Huey", began arriving In Vietnam in 1963. Before the end of the conflict, more than 5,000 of these versatile aircraft were introduced into Southeast Asia. "Hueys" were used for Med-Evac, command and control, and air assault, transport personnel and material; and as gun ships. Considered to be the most widely used helicopter in the world, with more than 9,000 produced from the 1950s to the present, the Huey is flown today by about 40 countries.

The UH-1 is one of the most modified helicopters in service today. It was originally designed for local air base rescue, it was delivered to the Air Force the early 1970s. It was the single engine version of the Huey first flown in 1956. It has been modified to more than 15 different models with numerous variations applied. It can carry 12 passengers and cargo or 6 litter racks for patients and 1 medical attendant.

This UH-1M helicopter S/N 66-15186 on display here was originally property of the US Army. This helicopter served with several different Army units in Vietnam from December 1967 — June 1970. It was acquired by the Armament Museum in December 1999.

It is depicted in paint scheme of the UH-1 helicopters that are currently flown by the 46th Test Wing, Eglin AFB, FL.
UH-1 Iroquois Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 26, 2017
2. UH-1 Iroquois Marker
The tail number of one of the unit's helicopters will be assigned when one of them is retired.

Specifications
Manufacturer Bell Helicopter Textron
Thrust One — Lycoming T53-L-13 Turbo shaft engine rated at 1,400 shaft hp
Length 42 ft 7 in
Height 12 ft 7 in
Rotor span 44 ft
Weight 5,071 lbs Empty / 9,500 lbs Max
Speed 148 mph Max / 123 mph Cruise
Range 382 miles
Ceiling 11,500 ft
Armament Options included — Door mounted M60 machine guns, Quad M60Cs on aircraft mounts, 20mm cannon, 2.75 inch rocket launchers, 40mm grenade launcher, 7.62mm "Miniguns", and AGM-22B anti-tank missiles
This aircraft ls part of the USAF Heritage Program collection
 
Location. 30° 27.999′ N, 86° 33.645′ W. Marker is in Eglin AFB, Florida, in Okaloosa County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Pinchot Road (State Road 189) and Museum Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at the Air Force Armament Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Museum Drive, Eglin AFB FL 32542, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. AGM-109 MRASM Missile (a few steps from this marker); T-33 T-Bird (within shouting distance of this marker);
UH-1 Iroquois Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 26, 2017
3. UH-1 Iroquois Marker
RF4-Phantom II (within shouting distance of this marker); CGM-13 Mace Missile (within shouting distance of this marker); Faithful Partner – Guardian of the Night (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Aerospace Site (within shouting distance of this marker); IM-99 BOMARC Launch Platform (within shouting distance of this marker); Mac Baker (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Eglin AFB.
 
Also see . . .
1. Air Force Armament Museum. (Submitted on April 11, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Bell UH-1 Iroquois on Wikipedia. (Submitted on April 11, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Military
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 136 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 11, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
Paid Advertisement