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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

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See all of the markers on the Fort Yellowstone walking tour.
 
Fort Yellowstone Marker image, Touch for more information
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
Fort Yellowstone Marker
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Sense of Community
The last of the structures built by the army (completed in 1913), the chapel added a finishing touch to the fort and was considered by far its most beautiful structure. The community held religious services in the troop mess hall, the post . . . — Map (db m87140) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — A Soldier’s Life
Here in Fort Yellowstone, a soldier lived with the rest of his company in the Troop Barracks (structure in front of you). A typical day began at 5:30 a.m. at the stable where the horses were fed and groomed. Activities could also include guard . . . — Map (db m87142) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Crime in Wonderland
From poachers to stagecoach robbers, soldiers were kept busy enforcing the law in Yellowstone. There were five stagecoach robberies in Yellowstone, with the last occurring on 1914. What is often considered the greatest stagecoach robbery of . . . — Map (db m123146) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Fort Yellowstone     National Historic Landmark
This is the only point in the park where an extensive transformation of natural conditions by the work of man has been permitted. Yet, it was unavoidable here, and in yielding to this necessity, the effort has been made to provide a . . . — Map (db m87127) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — From Soldier to Ranger
The National Park Service Act was signed on August 25, 1916. About one month later on September 30th, twenty-three soldiers were discharged from the army to be hired by the civilian agency as the first rangers in Yellowstone. Included with the . . . — Map (db m87144) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Guard Duty
Protecting Yellowstone’s wildlife and natural wonders was the primary aim of the army. An important part of this duty was managing the growing visitation to the park and watching for “shady characters.” Park roads were once aligned so . . . — Map (db m87139) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Life in the Fort
During the season (June, July, August, September), life at the post was always busy with fire patrol, guarding the thermal features, flirting with the maids of the hotels and camps, and going to dances. There were sports as well. Baseball was . . . — Map (db m87138) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — Road Builders
In 1883, when Lieutenant Dan C. Kingman and the Army Corps of Engineers arrived, the road situation was dismal. When the Corps left 35 year later, there were 400 miles of stable, secure roads which had been designed with the intent of allowing . . . — Map (db m87117) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Parade Ground
Gathering place, training ground, site of ceremonies and parades – the drill field was the focal point of daily life at Fort Yellowstone. Each day began early with a bugler sounding reveille. Gradually, the fort came to life, and another . . . — Map (db m87115) HM
Wyoming (Park County), Yellowstone National Park — The Post Exchange
At the Post Exchange, a soldier with free time could spend it in the gymnasium or bowling alley, or could play cards and drink beer. There may also have been a billiards table, and movies were shown once a week. The building was informally known . . . — Map (db m87143) HM

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