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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Archive War

 
 
The Archive War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, September 3, 2007
1. The Archive War Marker
Inscription. In 1839 Austin became the capital of the Republic of Texas. The National Archives – state papers and land titles – were housed on Congress Avenue. In 1842, after Mexican armies seized San Antonio and seemed likely to capture Austin, many residents fled in what was called “The Breakup”. From his home in Galveston, President Sam Houston ordered removal of the government papers. A local “Archive Committee” responded by burying them. The President then tried unsuccessfully to have Congress create a new capital near the coast. Later his men came secretly to haul the papers to the interim capital, Washington-on-the-Brazos. Loading them before dawn on Dec. 30, 1842.

Mrs. Angelina Eberly, a noted innkeeper and one of the few women in Austin during The Breakup, found the men loading the archives in darkness. Running to the city cannon on Congress Avenue at Pecan (6th) Street, she fired at the wagons. The 26 men departed with the records. About 68 citizens rode after them, hauling along the city cannon. Some 20 miles from Austin they retrieved the archives without bloodshed.

Because the archives remained here, the President and the Congress returned in 1845, preserving Austin as the capital of the Republic and (later) the state.
 
Erected 1978 by the
The Archive War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Heinich, August 24, 2014
2. The Archive War Marker
Texas Historical Association. (Marker Number 14722.)
 
Location. 30° 16.426′ N, 97° 44.322′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Touch for map. In front of the Lorenzo de Zavala Archives and Library Building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1201 Brazos St, Austin TX 78701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Texas and the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Hood’s Texas Brigade Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Terry’s Texas Rangers Monument (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. Martin’s Evangelical Lutheran Church (about 700 feet away); Texas Highway Department (about 700 feet away); Southern Confederacy Monument (about 700 feet away); The Great Walk (about 800 feet away); The Texas Capitol (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. See marker near Indianola, TX, where Angelina Bell Peyton Eberly was buried.
 
Also see . . .
1. Handbook of Texas - Archive War. (Submitted on December 23, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.)
2. Texas State Library & Archives Commission - The Archives War. (Submitted on December 23, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.)
 
Categories. GovernmentNotable EventsWar, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 29, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 23, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 804 times since then and 57 times this year. Last updated on December 24, 2016, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. Photos:   1. submitted on December 23, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   2. submitted on August 24, 2014, by Michael Heinich of Austin, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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