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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Galveston Orphans Home

 
 
Galveston Orphans Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Walker
1. Galveston Orphans Home Marker
Inscription. The Island City Orphans Home of the 1870s and 1880s was created to provide refuge for Protestant and Jewish children in Galveston. The orphanage operated out of its original wooden structure for the next twelve years, narrowly escaping destruction in the November 1885 fire which burned houses in the immediate neighborhood. When prominent businessman and philanthropist Henry Rosenberg died in 1893, his will appointed a building fund for the orphanage. Galveston architect Alfred Muller was hired to design the Gothic Revival style structure and Thomas Lucas and Sons was chosen as the builder. The "Galveston Orphans Home," a name that it would retain for over 80 years, was dedicated on November 15, 1895.

On September 8, 1900, a powerful hurricane devastated the island and the Orphans Home was heavily damaged. To benefit the reconstruction of the Orphans Home, a charity bazaar sponsored by William Randolph Hearst was held in New York City. With the $50,000 raised at the event, the Orphans Home board hired architect George B. Stowe to design the new building. Incorporating parts of the original building left standing, the new Orphans Home was constructed by local builder Harry Devlin in the Renaissance Revival style. The building was dedicated on March 30, 1902. Community support for the Galveston Orphans Home continued by way of
Galveston Orphans Home with Marker on the right image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Walker, July 27, 2016
2. Galveston Orphans Home with Marker on the right
donations and annual charity galas. In 1984, Galveston's orphanages combined to create the Children's Center, Inc. and moved to a different location, leaving this building vacant. For over a century, the Orphans Home provided a shelter for thousands of children and was a significant organization and charity for citizens of Galveston Island.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 1826.)
 
Location. 29° 17.851′ N, 94° 47.326′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is on Moody Avenue south of Avenue M Rear, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. g Marker is in this post office area: Galveston TX 77550, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Dealey (here, next to this marker); Galveston Children's Home (a few steps from this marker); Franklin-Wandless House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. Joseph's Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Reedy Chapel A.M.E. Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Reedy Chapel A. M. E. Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sweeney-Royston House (approx. mile away); William J. Killeen House (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Regarding Galveston Orphans Home.
Nerium oleander near Galveston Orphans Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, April 28, 2017
3. Nerium oleander near Galveston Orphans Home Marker
Yellow Nerium oleanders are somewhat unusual. This one is beside the marker. Galveston is the oleander city. The International Oleander Society is located in Galveston. In 1841 Mrs. Isadore Dyer's (a Galveston resident) brother-in-law brought her oleander plants from Jamaica. Galveston believes this was the introduction of oleanders into the U.S. This yellow flower may be a Sue Hawley Oakes named after the lady who bread this unusual variety.
This building is now the Bryan Museum dedicated to historical collections and memorabilia Texas and the American West. It is a must see museum for those interested in the history of Texas.

https://www.thebryanmuseum.or
 
Also see . . .  The Bryan Museum. The Galveston Orphans Home is now the The Bryan Museum of Texas history and the old west. (Submitted on April 28, 2017, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkMan-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 3, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 30, 2016, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas. This page has been viewed 136 times since then and 81 times this year. Last updated on April 28, 2017, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 30, 2016, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.   3. submitted on April 28, 2017, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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