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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Marye’s Heights

 
 
Marye’s Heights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 13, 2008
1. Marye’s Heights Marker
Inscription. A Northern photographer took this picture of Marye’s Heights in May 1864, setting up his camera in front of “Federal Hill,” a large white house approximately 250 yards to your left-rear. Seventeen months earlier, thousands of Union soldiers caught a glimpse of this panoramic view as they hurried past Federal Hill on their way to attack Marye’s Heights.

Although streets and houses now cover the plain where thousands of soldiers died, important remnants of the Civil War landscape can still be found. Hanover Street, on your immediate left, follows the same course that it did in 1862. The canal ditch that bisected the street has been covered and paved, to make modern Kenmore Avenue, but, the abrupt bluff adjacent to the canal, which sheltered Union soldiers as they formed for their attack, is still visible in the back yard of the house directly across the intersection from you. Several nineteenth-century buildings still remain.
 
Erected by City of Fredericksburg.
 
Location. 38° 17.941′ N, 77° 27.901′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Kenmore Avenue and Hanover Street, on the left when traveling east on Kenmore Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Original Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 2, 2007
2. The Original Marker
At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Canal Ditch (here, next to this marker); Ravaged Town (here, next to this marker); Fredericksburg Campaign (a few steps from this marker); Barton Street Confederate Monument (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Barton Street Potter's Field (about 700 feet away); Liberty Town (about 700 feet away); Fredericksburg Roll of Honor (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Memorial Landscape (approx. 0.2 miles away); From a Burying Ground to a Park (approx. ¼ mile away); The Corporation Burying Ground (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Regarding Marye’s Heights. This marker was repaired and revised in 2008. The Original Marker Text Read:

A Northern photographer took this picture of Marye’s Heights in May 1864, setting up his camera in front of “Federal Hill,” a large white house approximately 250 yards to your left-rear. Seventeen months earlier, thousands of Union soldiers had marched past Federal Hill on their way to attack Marye’s Heights. For many, this panoramic view of the Confederate position was their last earthly sight.

Although streets and houses now cover the plain where thousands of soldiers died, important remnants of the Civil War landscape can still be found. Hanover Street, on
The Canal Ditch (now Kenmore Avenue) during the Civil War image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
3. The Canal Ditch (now Kenmore Avenue) during the Civil War
your immediate left, follows the same course that it did in 1862. The canal ditch that bisected the street has been filled in and paved to make modern Kenmore Avenue, however, the abrupt bluff adjacent to the canal, which sheltered Union soldiers as they formed for their attack, is still visible in the back yard of the house directly across the intersection from you. Several 19th-century buildings still remain.
 
Additional keywords. Fredericksburg Campaign
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Marye’s Heights Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 15, 2007
4. Marye’s Heights Marker
"Federal Hill" image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
5. "Federal Hill"
"Rowe House" image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
6. "Rowe House"
A modern view of the abrupt bluff adjacent to the canal image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
7. A modern view of the abrupt bluff adjacent to the canal
Fredericksburg Campaign image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
8. Fredericksburg Campaign
“December 13, 1862. The blue columns of the Army of the Potomac deployed here in the Canal Ditch valley, along the route of present Kenmore Avenue. Then with drums beating and flags flying, the long battle lines advanced towards Marye’s Heights and were mowed down by Confederate artillery and musketry fire.” United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 2, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,547 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 15, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on June 2, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on June 4, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on September 15, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on June 4, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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