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US Civil War Topic

 
Mulbry Grove Cottage & Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
Mulbry Grove Cottage & Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT WITH USA FIRST
1Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Mulbry Grove CottageMcWilliams - Smith - Rice House
Built circa, 1840s by A.K. McWilliams, this story and one-half Federal-style raised cottage with Greek Revival elements was the residence of Amos Smith, who named the town of Prattville. The west front parlor was the meeting place where the . . . — Map (db m27982) HM
2Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Pratt Gin Factory — 1 mile —
Once the world's largest plant manufacturing cotton gins. Founded 1833 by Daniel Pratt, the greatest industrialist of Alabama prior to 1860. Pratt's many industries were of great aid to Confederacy during Northern blockade. — Map (db m70799) HM
3Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Prattville Dragoons
On this memorial are engraved the names of the 100 original officers and men of the Prattville Dragoons. Their dedication to their families, their homes and their county is remembered and honored by their descendants. Officers Jessie . . . — Map (db m129581) WM
4Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Sidney Lanier/Prattville Male and Female Academy Site
Side 1 Sidney Lanier 1842-1881 The poet and musician, born in Macon, Georgia, was Academy principal in 1867-68. He married Mary H. Day of Macon in December 1867. In Prattville, they lived at the Mims Hotel and later in Dr. S.P. . . . — Map (db m70802) HM
5Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — The Prattville Dragoons
This boulder erected by The Merrill E. Pratt Chapter U.D.C. April 26, 1916, marks the spot where The Prattville Dragoons assembled in April, 1861, on the eve of their departure to the war, and is commemorative of their . . . — Map (db m70819) HM WM
6Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Alabama
(front) In memory of the Alabama Confederate States of America Soldiers Sailors who served at Fort Blakeley Dedicated by Mobile Bay District United Daughters of the Confederacy 2010 (back) Chapters Bonnie . . . — Map (db m87295) WM
7Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Battle of BlakeleyApril 9, 1865
Missouri Brigade (CSA) 1st & 4th Missouri Infantry Regiment 2nd & 6th Missouri Infantry Regiment 3rd & 5th Missouri Infantry Regiment 1st & 3rd Missouri Cavalry Battalion (Dismounted) 3rd (St Louis) Missouri Battery US . . . — Map (db m87292) WM
8Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Fort Blakeley (Fort Blakely*)
Fort Blakeley, named for the town which it surrounded, was one of two major Confederate defensive positions protecting eastern approaches to Mobile during the Civil War. The fort consisted of a nearly three mile long series of entrenchments anchored . . . — Map (db m131891) HM
9Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Redoubt Six
Artillery and musketry swept them in the face, and sand-bombs burst from under their feet. At last the ditch was reached...the garrison's infantry poured a galling fire from the loop-holes, and the heavy siege guns rained grape(shot) from the . . . — Map (db m131865) HM
10Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Battle of Fort Blakeley
You are standing on the site of the last grand charge of the Civil War, made during the Battle of Fort Blakeley on April 9. 1865. The battle was the climax of a months-long campaign that led ultimately to the capture of the city of Mobile by Union . . . — Map (db m131890) HM
11Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Battle of Fort Blakely
The Battle of Fort Blakely April 9, 1865 was the last major battle of the Civil War. This 67 acre part of the Blakeley Battlefield was acquired in 2002 with assistance of grants from the Land & Water Conservation Fund administered by the National . . . — Map (db m87296) HM
12Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Siege of Fort Blakeley
"Each man was provided with a spade, and at the given signal, the line advanced in good shape, though opposed by a sharp fire." Brig. Gen. Christopher C. Andrews The Union Army laid siege to Fort Blakeley for over a week prior to the . . . — Map (db m131932) HM
13Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The United States Colored Troops (USCT) at the Battle of Fort Blakeley
Greater gallantry than was shown by officers and men could hardly be desired. The (troops) were burning with an impulse to do honor to their race, and rushed forward with intense enthusiasm, in face of a terrible fire." Brig. Gen. . . . — Map (db m131903) HM
14Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Union Artillery Batteries
Though outnumbering Confederate troops at Blakeley better than four to one, the Union Army had decidedly less artillery than the fort's defenders: By the time of the final assault on the fort on April 9, 1865, about 20 guns were scattered along the . . . — Map (db m131859) HM
15Alabama (Baldwin County), Bon Secour — Stop 3 — Vicinity of Salt Works and Camp Anderson“Salt Is Eminently Contraband” — Civil War Trail Battle for Mobile Bay —
Both people and animals need salt to remain healthy. Before the Civil War the people of Alabama consumed about 50 pounds of salt per person per year, most of which came from England and the West Indies. One quarter of all the salt imported into the . . . — Map (db m68503) HM
16Alabama (Baldwin County), Fairhope — Confederate Rest Cemetery
The Grand Hotel and the Gunnison House served as a hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers from the Battle of Vicksburg during the Civil War. The Confederate Rest Cemetery commemorates more than 300 Confederate soldiers who died while in the . . . — Map (db m153433) HM
17Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — Colors of Significance: Historic Flags of Mobile Point
Traditionally referred to as "colors', flags have long been used to identify nations, loyalties, and movements. As the sands have shifted through the ages, so too have the colors and loyalties of the Gulf Coast. Displayed here are a small section of . . . — Map (db m118331) HM
18Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — Noble Leslie DeVotie
First Alabama soldier to lose life in Civil War. DeVotie graduated in 1856 from University of Alabama; Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Princeton in 1859. In 1856 at the University of Alabama, he was chief founder of Sigma Alpha . . . — Map (db m4219) HM
19Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — The Battery BaileyPosition of the 2nd Connecticut Light Artillery August 20-25, 1864
Construction began on August 19th on two artillery positions that were emplaced only 200 yards from the southeast bastion of Fort Morgan. These positions, which were part of Battery Bailey, anchored the southern flank of the Federal siege lines. . . . — Map (db m118336) HM WM
20Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — The Pride of Seven Flags
(East Face): Tribute dedicated to the memory of the soldiers who gave their lives in the defense of our country here at Fort Morgan. Here lies the pride of seven flags entombed in our ancestor’s worth, who heard the thunder of the fray . . . — Map (db m4649) HM
21Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — "Damn The Torpedoes!" The Campaigns for Mobile, 1864 - 1865
(preface) "Damn the Torpedoes!" is a familiar battle cry, but there's more to the story! The Mobile Civil War Trail is your guide to military movements and the way of life on and around Mobile Bay in the closing two years of the Civil . . . — Map (db m87247) HM
22Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Stop C4 — "The Shells Were Bursting All Around Us"The Siege of Fort Morgan: — Stop C4 —
After the surrender of Fort Gaines, U.S. General Gordon Granger prepared to besiege Fort Morgan. On August 9, 1864, he moved by transport to Navy Cove and debarked 2,000 men and his siege equipment at the Pilot Town wharf. By 2:00 p.m. he had . . . — Map (db m87246) HM
23Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — 32 Pounder Sea Coast Defense GunOn Barbette Carriage
This smoothbore, muzzle-loading cannon was one of the main coast defense weapons in the United States' arsenal when Fort Morgan was completed in 1834. With an eight pound charge of powder the gun could fire a 32 pound solid iron shot about one . . . — Map (db m87245) HM
24Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — 6.4” (100 pounder) Parrott Rifle / 7” Brooke Rifle
6.4” (100 pounder) Parrott Rifle Designed by Robert Parker Parrott at the outbreak of the Civil War, the Parrott Rifle became one of the most used rifled artillery pieces during the war. With shells that exploded on impact, rifled . . . — Map (db m69898) HM
25Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Citadel (1825-1865)
The Citadel, a large ten sided brick and wood structure, once dominated the Fort’s parade ground. Completed in 1825 as a defensive barracks, it was capable of housing 400 soldiers. During the Union bombardment on August 22, 1864, the pine . . . — Map (db m68751) HM
26Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Navy Cove / Pilot Town
Navy Cove The Mobile Bay shoreline just inside Mobile Point, close to Fort Morgan, is known as Navy Cove. This was the site of Native American villages for over two thousand years. The name came after the British Navy anchored here . . . — Map (db m122441) HM
27Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — The Battery LincolnPosition of Company “C” of the 20th Iowa Infantry
Completed on August 18th, Battery Lincoln was located near the northern end of the Federal siege lines of Fort Morgan. Company “C” of the 20th Iowa Infantry Regiment, under the command of Captain Mark L. Thomson, was detailed to serve . . . — Map (db m81809) HM
28Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Stop C1 — The Battle of Mobile Bay“A Deadly Rain of Shot and Shell” — Civil War Trail, Battle for Mobile Bay —
Eager to attack Mobile Bay since 1862, U. S. Admiral David Farragut knew he could not capture control of the lower bay without the support of the army and without a flotilla of ironclad monitors to confront the Confederate ironclad CSS . . . — Map (db m68815) HM
29Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Stop C3 — The Battle of Mobile Bay“Damn the Torpedoes!” — Civil War Trail, Battle for Mobile Bay —
At 7:25 a.m., August 5, 1864, Admiral Farragut’s lead monitor Tecumseh steered into the torpedo field at the mouth of Mobile Bay. The admiral had ordered Commander Tunis Craven, the Tecumseh’s captain, to engage the ram . . . — Map (db m69412) HM
30Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Stop C2 — The Battle of Mobile Bay“Now I Am In The Humor, I Will Have It Out!” — Civil War Trail, Battle for Mobile Bay —
As the Hartford and Brooklyn steamed into the lower bay, the Tennessee tried to ram both in succession but was too slow and had to let them pass. Admiral Buchanan then exchanged broadsides with the rest of Admiral Farragut’s . . . — Map (db m69617) HM
31Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — The Citadel(1821-1865)
The Citadel, a large ten sided brick and wood structure, once dominated the Fort’s parade ground. Capable of housing 400 soldiers, it served as a defensive barracks for the Fort’s garrison. During the Union bombardment of Fort Morgan on August . . . — Map (db m92994) HM
32Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — The Overland CampaignStorm Clouds Gather — Civil War Trail, Battle for Mobile Bay —
To Wait and Watch In late August 1864 the Federals controlled Mobile Bay but could not attack Mobile. Admiral Farragut could not reach the city even with his light draft vessels, because the channels in the upper Bay had been obstructed. . . . — Map (db m69909) HM
33Alabama (Baldwin County), Magnolia Springs — The Springs
Old tales have it that early explorers and even pirate vessels obtained potable water from springs scattered throughout the community of Magnolia Springs. This park is located at the largest of dozens of springs in the area. In 1865 The . . . — Map (db m68486) HM
34Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — “Damn The Torpedoes!”The Campaigns for Mobile, 1864-1965
“Damn The Torpedoes!” is the familiar battle cry, but there’s much more to the story! The Mobile Bay Civil War Trail is your guide to military movements and the way of life on and around Mobile Bay in the closing two years of the Civil . . . — Map (db m81853) HM
35Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops
This earthen mound was part of a redoubt constructed by the 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops in April, 1865. The regiment saw considerable action against Confederate warships protecting the Blakely River. These earthworks have been preserved as a . . . — Map (db m100853) HM
36Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Albert Carey Danner — 1843~1921 —
Born in Winchester, Virginia, he moved to Missouri where at age 17 he enlisted in the State Guard. In 1861 he became a Private in the Confederate States Army, was captured during the Battle of Wilson's Creek and escaped. Captain Danner . . . — Map (db m100880) HM
37Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Caisson Trace
A trail used in early times by Indians, Spanish Explorers, French Settlers and later by soldiers during the battle of Spanish Fort 1865. At one time a stream driven train paralleled this trace. Its ancient road bed can still be seen south of this . . . — Map (db m100877) HM
38Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Drive
Named in honor of the 1,810 Men in Gray who defended the eastern approaches to Mobile in the battle of Spanish Fort March 26 ~ April 8-9, 1865. Here Brig. Gen. R. L. Gibson, C.S.A. engaged “…more than 20,000” enemy troops in the last . . . — Map (db m100878) HM
39Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Main Line of Resistance(The Battle of Spanish Fort, March 26-April 9, 1865)
Twenty-nine Union field guns, manned by men of the 3d Indiana, 1st Illinois and 2d Iowa Batteries, shelled these Confederate trenches for 13 consecutive days and nights. The fact that these trenches were never breached, attests to the courage of . . . — Map (db m100873) HM
40Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Redoubt No. 3 / Gibson’s Brigade
Side 1 Capt. Cuthbert Slocomb of the 5th Company, Washington Artillery of New Orleans, commanded Redoubt No. 3, also known as Battery Blair, consisted of one 8-inch Columbiad, two 12-pound Napoleons, one 3-inch ordinance rifle, and . . . — Map (db m120342) HM
41Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Redoubt No. 4 / Holtzclaw's Brigade
Side 1 Redoubt No. 4 was part of the Confederate line known as Red Fort. Capt. John Phillip’s Tennessee Light Artillery manned the redoubt until they were relieved on April 4, 1865 by Garrity's Alabama Light Artillery. Lt. Henry . . . — Map (db m120341) HM
42Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Redoubt No. 5 / Ector's Brigade
Side 1 Also called the Sandbag Battery, Redoubt No. 5 was originally commanded by Lt. Andrew Hargrove of Lumsden's Tuscaloosa Battery, Company F, 2nd Alabama Light Artillery Battalion. During the early stages of the battle, Lumsden's . . . — Map (db m120340) HM
43Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Fort McDermott
From this Confederate Fort 15 heavy artillery guns, repelled elements of 2 Union Army Corps, routed 5 ironclad monitors attacking up the Blakely River and for 13 days helped prevent the capture of Mobile until after General Lee's Surrender at . . . — Map (db m100911) HM
44Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Fort McDermott
Highest point along 2 miles of Confederate battle lines extending east and north. Here 200 soldiers from Georgia, Louisiana & Arkansas, held off a numerically superior Union Force for thirteen days and nights in the last battle of the War Between . . . — Map (db m100913) HM
45Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Ft. McDermott Confederate Memorial Park
Dedicated to the men of the Confederate States of America who valiantly fought for our American liberties, "Governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed... whenever any form of government becomes . . . — Map (db m100936) HM
46Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Red Fort
Built of red clay, armed with 12 heavy guns and served by 307 crack Confederate Artilleryman from Batteries Perry (Tenn.) Phillips (Tenn.) Lumsden (Ala.) and Garrity (Mobile, Ala.). It was the keystone in the defense of Spanish Fort, 1865. — Map (db m100868) HM
47Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Site Of The Naval Battery
Manned with sailors and commanded by Lt. Commander Gillis of the U.S.S. Milwaukee, which was sunk by a Confederate torpedo in Blakeley River. Armed with two 4.2 in. Parrott rifled cannon firing projectiles weighing 30 lbs., these guns fired on . . . — Map (db m120346) HM
48Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Spanish Fort
Rendezvous for Indians, Spanish, French and English Explorers. In 1865, Three Confederate Brigades, outnumbered 10 to 1, engaged the Army of West Mississippi (Union Forces) in the last battle of the War Between the States. March 26~April 9, 1865. — Map (db m100844) HM
49Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Spanish FortAlabama
Historic Spot of the Deep SouthMap (db m100845) HM
50Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Stop 7 Fort McDermott:"The Men Dig,Dig,Dig" — Civil War Trail —
Late on March 26, C.S. General St. John Liddell withdrew into the relative safety of Fort Blakeley and Spanish Fort, Liddell, assisted by General Francis Cockrell, assumed personal responsibility for the defense of Blakeley and put the defense of . . . — Map (db m88990) HM
51Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Stop 8 The Eighth Iowa Line:“The Very Air Was Hot”
Canby brought up his heavy guns from Stark’s Landing a process that took several days, beginning on the 28th. Supported by the Federal monitors, Chickasaw and Winnebago, Canby tried to pound the enemy into submission The Confederates naturally . . . — Map (db m88991) HM
52Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — The 8th Iowa InfantryBattle of Spanish Fort
On the evening of April 8th, 1865, while the Confederate fortifications were being shelled by Union artillery, the 8th Iowa Infantry advanced from near this point to the Confederate left and captured a part of the works, in hand to hand fighting. . . . — Map (db m100883) HM
53Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — The Final Assault
At dusk on April 8, 1865, 300 yards west of this site, the Union Army's 8th lowa Infantry and three Illinois Regiments breached the Confederate main line of resistance. Under the cover of night, troops holding the thin gray line spiked their guns . . . — Map (db m100855) HM
54Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — The Union First Parallel / Union Siege Battery No. 16
Side 1 The main Union siege line during the Battle of Spanish Fort ran along this ridge. Brig. Gen. Eugene Carr's Division occupied the right flank of the Union line between here and Minette Bay. Carr's men initially faced Confederate . . . — Map (db m100857) HM
55Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Union Siege Battery No. 1
Near this site was the location of the first of twenty-two artillery positions the Union army set up to bombard the Confederate fortifications of Spanish Fort. The Confederate forces were under the command of Brig Gen. Randall Gibson. Battery Tracy, . . . — Map (db m120331) HM
56Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Union Siege Battery No. 21 / 3rd Brigade of Carr's Division
Union Siege Battery No. 21 Located on this bluff overlooking Minette Bay, Battery No. 21 anchored the right flank of Maj. Gen. Edward Canby's Army of West Mississippi during the Battle of Spanish Fort. Maj. Gen. Andrew Smith's XVI Army . . . — Map (db m120339) HM
57Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Sea Coast MortarUnion Weapon from the Civil War
Weight: 17,200 pounds Bore: 13 inches Maximum Range: 4,325 yards (almost 2.5 miles) Cast in Ft. Pitt, PA in 1862 Largest piece of artillery used in the Civil War, It was used for sea coast fortifications or on mortar boats for . . . — Map (db m122473) HM
58Alabama (Barbour County), Batesville — Fort Browder/15th Alabama Infantry
side 1 Fort Browder Approximately one mile south-southwest of here stood Fort Browder, a small wooden fortification built in 1836 for protection in the last war with the Creek Indians and named for Isham Browder, a prominent . . . — Map (db m60895) HM
59Alabama (Barbour County), Clayton — Octagon House
This unusual house was built 1859 – 1861 by Benjamin Franklin Petty, a carriage and furniture merchant, who was a native of New York and a pioneer settler of Clayton. It was patterned after a design made popular by Orson S. Fowler’s book A . . . — Map (db m39121) HM
60Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Confederate Hospital1861 - 1865
“Sanctuary for valiant and courageous men” Built for a river tavern 1836 — Map (db m27986) HM
61Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Fendall Hall / Young and DentThe Young - Dent Home
Built between 1856 and 1860 by Edward Brown Young and his wife, Ann Fendall Beall, this was one of the first of the great Italianate style homes constructed in Eufaula. It later became the home of the builders’ daughter, Anna Beall Young, and her . . . — Map (db m33759) HM
62Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — General Grierson’s March
This road marks the entrance into Eufaula of Federal Troops on April 29, 1865. Lee had surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9. General Benjamin H. Grierson was advancing with four thousand cavalry from Mobile and was then about at . . . — Map (db m82872) HM
63Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Absalom Pratt House
Absalom Pratt built this house 8 miles west of here circa 1835 though a section was constructed earlier. It was moved to this site in 1994 by the Cahaba Trace Commission, restored by the Alabama Historic Ironworks Commission, 1997-98, and dedicated . . . — Map (db m37078) HM
64Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Bibb Furnace
The Bibb County Iron Company under the direction of C. C. Huckabee of Newbern, Alabama, constructed a furnace here and poured the first iron in November 1862. Within a year, the Confederate government purchased the works and completed a second and . . . — Map (db m37090) HM
65Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Bibb Naval Furnaces Brierfield Furnaces— ½ mile →
. . . — Map (db m37055) HM
66Alabama (Bibb County), Centreville — Centreville CemeteryBibb County
Centreville Cemetery is older than the town of Centreville itself. The earliest known burial is that of Willie Coleman, dated 1822, and Centreville was established in 1823. One half of the cemetery, known as Cooper Cemetery, contains mostly the . . . — Map (db m156403) HM
67Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Battle RoyalMay 1, 1863
Nathan Bedford Forrest attacked Col. Streight’s column as it crossed Locust’s swift waters, causing the Federals to make tremendous exertions to complete the movement, contributing thereby to Streight’s eventual surrender of his entire command to . . . — Map (db m28320) HM
68Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — None — Blountsville Court Square Timeline
1813: Colonel John Coffee and 800 Tennessee Volunteers see Bear Meat Cabin Cherokee Settlement near Blountsville 1816: Town settles around square 1820: Newly named Blountsville becomes county seat 1827: Town incorporated with Trustee System . . . — Map (db m49176) HM
69Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Exploit of Murphree SistersIncident of May 1, 1863 during Streight (USA) -Forrest (CSA) Campaign.
Three prowling Union soldiers invaded home of sister-in-law of Celia and Winnie Mae Murphree taking food, drink; killing two colts. When soldiers fell asleep, these two young girls took rifles, marched soldiers to headquarters of General . . . — Map (db m83226) HM
70Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Federal RaidMay 1, 1863 — 1 mile south —
Gen. N.B. Forrest (CSA) captured wagon train and supplies of Col. Streight's raiders (USA). Forrest continued his relentless pursuit eastward toward final capture of Streight. — Map (db m24363) HM
71Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — Confederate Memorial
Drill Ground of the Midway Guards 1860, later Company B 15th Alabama C.S.A. ordered to Richmond. Second Company 1861 assigned to Company C 45th Alabama C.S.A. ordered to Army of Tennessee. These and many later volunteers met the enemy in . . . — Map (db m89636) HM
72Alabama (Bullock County), Midway — Jefferson Davis Highway
Soldiers of the Confederacy and of the World War — Map (db m111575) HM
73Alabama (Bullock County), Union Springs — Log Cabin Museum/Old City Cemetery
Log Cabin Museum Early settlers of this area cleared land and built their first homes of logs in the early 1830s. This cabin was built by Reuben Rice Kirkland (1829-1915) about 1850. He and his first wife had ten children while living in . . . — Map (db m60969) HM
74Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Confederate Park/Greenville City Hall-Site of Public School
Side 1 Confederate Park Confederate Park was created in 1897 as a joint effort of the Father Ryan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the City of Greenville, with First United Methodist Church providing the Park . . . — Map (db m70749) HM
75Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Our Confederate Dead
Front: Our Confederate Dead Back: To the memory of Butler Co's Confederate Soldiers West: Erected 1903 by the Father Ryan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. East: Dead, but his spirit breathes; Dead, . . . — Map (db m70768) WM
76Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Our Confederate Dead Monument
North side: Our Confederate Dead West side: Erected 1903 by the The Father Ryan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. South side: To the memory of Butler CO's . . . — Map (db m130089) WM
77Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Site of Confederate Hospital1861 – 1865
Title is textMap (db m130053) HM
78Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — Major John PelhamWas born here → — September 7, 1838 —
Commanded Horse Artillery of Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A. Killed at Kelly’s Ford, Va. March 17, 1863 Styled “The Gallant Pelham” By Robert E. Lee — Map (db m36546) HM
79Alabama (Calhoun County), Anniston — The Birthplace of the “Gallant Pelham”
Major John Pelham C.S.A. Born September 14, 1838 at the home of his Grand Parents William McGehee and Elizabeth Clay McGehee Erected by Forney District U.D.C. May 5, 1937 — Map (db m36547) HM
80Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — 10th Alabama VolunteersArmy of Northern Virginia, C.S.A.
This regiment took part for four years in major battles of Virginia theater. It served with distinction for dash and courage, suffering heavy casualties. Officers at regiment’s organization June 4, 1861 at Montgomery, Alabama; Colonel John . . . — Map (db m36465) HM
81Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Beauregard's Headquarters
This house, "Ten Oaks", was headquarters for Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, Oct. 15-23, 1864, when he coordinated the movement of Gen. J.B. Hood's army, then marching across northeast Alabama enroute to Nashville. He and his retinue, including Gov. I.G. . . . — Map (db m29919) HM
82Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Confederate Hospital
This Church was used for a Confederate Hospital During the War Between The States Erected by General John H. Forney Chapter U.D.C. Sept 27, 1937 — Map (db m36539) HM
83Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Forney’s Corner
Jacob Forney III lived and operated a thriving mercantile establishment at Jacksonville from 1835-56 on the south-east corner of the square. He and his wife Sabina Swope Hoke were the parents of nine children. 1. Daniel Peter - b. Feb. 24, 1819, . . . — Map (db m36450) HM
84Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — General Leonidas Polk C.S.A.
Bishop of Louisiana Held service in this church 1864 Erected by General John H. Forney Chapter U.D.C. April 26, 1937 — Map (db m36535) HM
85Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Jacksonville, Alabama“Gem of the Hills”
Life here has long centered on education beginning in 1834 when a one-acre plot of land was reserved for a schoolhouse. Through the years, various institutions of higher learning developed that culminated into present-day Jacksonville State . . . — Map (db m36429) HM
86Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — John Horace Forney1829-1902 — Major General, C.S.A. —
Graduate of West Point, resigned from U.S. Army to volunteer services to State of Alabama. Ably led Confederate forces at Manassas, Pensacola, Vicksburg, Mobile, Texas. — Map (db m36482) HM
87Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — John Tyler Morgan1824-1907
Lawyer, Soldier, Senator ← Lived here in 1838 1862-63 Colonel of 51st Alabama Cavalry Raised by him in this county 1863-65 Brigadier General C.S.A. with Wheeler’s Cavalry 1876-1907 United States Senator Distinguished . . . — Map (db m36468) HM
88Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Maj. John Pelham1838-1863
"The Gallant Pelham" as called by Robert E. Lee Commanded Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia. Cited for conspicuous valor many times. Killed in action in Virginia. — Map (db m29920) HM
89Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Pelham
Front: Maj. John Pelham born in Alexandria, Alabama killed at the battle of Kelly's Ford March 17, 1863 Front base: Pelham North side: Erected by the General John H. Forney Chapter U.D.C. Jacksonville, . . . — Map (db m23588) HM
90Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — The DepotChief Ladiga Trail
The Depot was constructed in 1860 by the Selma, Rome and Dalton (GA) Railroad. It was used as a transfer and storage point for Confederate troops and materials during the War Between the States. — Map (db m36443) HM
91Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Thomas A. Walker1811-1888
Prominent citizen of Jacksonville who served Alabama as Brigadier General, State Militia; member Legislature and Pres. of Senate; Circuit Court Judge; and Pres. Ala. and Tenn. Railroad He owned extensive cotton plantations and mining interests . . . — Map (db m29921) HM
92Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — William Henry Forney1823-1894
Brigadier General C.S.A. With Army of Virginia 1861-1865. Wounded in battle five times. He was one of four distinguished sons of Jacob Forney and Sabina Swope Hoke of Jacksonville who held commissions in the Confederate Army. . . . — Map (db m36480) HM
93Alabama (Calhoun County), Ohatchee — Janney Furnace
The furnace was constructed by Montgomery businessman Alfred A. Janney, reportedly using slaves brought from Tennessee by a "Dr. Smith." The furnace was completed and ready to produce pig iron when, on July 14, 1864, a Union cavalry raiding force of . . . — Map (db m25544) HM
94Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Historic Oxford
First incorporated as a town, February 7, 1852, in Benton County, Oxford's second incorporation was approved February 21, 1860 in Calhoun County. Long before this territory was “settled”, it was inhabited by Creek Indians. In the time . . . — Map (db m106589) HM
95Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Simmons Park
The town of Oxford was first incorporated by the Alabama legislature in 1852. The original boundaries included a one square mile area enlarged in 1860. Oxford became active as a cotton and trading center but during the Civil War growth slowed, and . . . — Map (db m106591) HM
96Alabama (Chambers County), LaFayette — LaFayette CemeteryChambers County
LaFayette Cemetery, also known as Westview, began in 1934 with the death of Miss Sarah Gipson. Many early pioneers and veterans of East Alabama are buried here including Revolutionary War Patriot Capt. Alexander Dunn, Col. Charles McLemore, . . . — Map (db m83263) HM
97Alabama (Cherokee County), Cedar Bluff — Cornwall Furnace
The Confederate States of America in 1862 commissioned the Noble Brothers of Rome, Georgia to erect a cold blast furnace to produce needed pig iron for the war effort. The skilled labor was detailed from Confederate army personnel. It is . . . — Map (db m83267) HM
98Alabama (Cherokee County), Cedar Bluff — Cornwall FurnaceA Victim of Union General William T. Sherman
Built in late 1862 by the Noble brothers, Cornwall Furnace was named for a similar blast iron furnace in James Noble's home state of Pennsylvania. The pig iron ingots produced from this facility were taken to the Noble Foundry in Rome where they . . . — Map (db m156264) HM
99Alabama (Cherokee County), Cedar Bluff — Cornwall Furnace Memorial Park
The furnace was constructed 1862-1863 by the Nobles Brothers Foundry from Rome, GA using financing from the Confederate States of America. Slave labor was used to dig a half mile canal upstream to the Chattooga River, which powered the airblast. A . . . — Map (db m156261) HM
100Alabama (Cherokee County), Cedar Bluff — Gen. John B. Hood Headquarters
Gen. Hood, commanding the Dept. of Tennessee and Georgia for the Confederate Army, made his headquarters in this house on Oct. 19, 1864 on his retreat from Atlanta to Tennessee via Gadsden. His army numbered approximately 40,000 troops. — Map (db m116615) HM

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Sep. 28, 2020