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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manhattan in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

General Grant Memorial

 
 
General Grant Memorial marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
1. General Grant Memorial marker
Inscription. General Grant Memorial, popularly known as “Grant’s Tomb,” is the largest mausoleum in America. Its monumental size reflects the public admiration for Ulysses S. Grant --- Union general during the Civil War, and 18th President of the United States.

After President Benjamin Harrison laid the cornerstone in 1892, it took six years to build the 150-foot-high memorial, using 8,000 tons of granite. Huge crowds attended the dedication in 1897 to honor the man they credited with winning the Civil War, ending slavery, and reuniting the nation.

“I have given the subject of arming the Negro my hearty support. This, with the emancipation of the Negro, is the heaviest blow yet given the Confederacy….They will make good soldiers and by taking them from the enemy weakens him in the same proportion they strengthen us.”
- Ulysses S. Grant, 1864
 
Erected by General Grant National Memorial, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 40° 48.782′ N, 73° 57.775′ W. Marker is in Manhattan, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Riverside Drive and West 122nd Street, on the left when traveling north on Riverside Drive. Touch for map.
General Grant Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 29, 2012
2. General Grant Memorial Marker
Marker is directly east of Grant's Tomb, on Riverside Drive, just north of West 122nd Street. The marker is a few blocks from the 125th Street Metro Station. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10027, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Amiable Child Monument (here, next to this marker); Sakura Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Tomb of General U.S. Grant (within shouting distance of this marker); General Daniel Butterfield Statue (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Sakura Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Japanese Lantern (about 400 feet away); Four Chaplains Memorial (about 400 feet away); New York Korean War Memorial (about 400 feet away).
 
More about this marker. The center photograph on the marker shows "West Point cadets march past the General Grant Memorial during its dedication parade (right) on April 27, 1897 -- the 75th anniversary of Grant’s birth." A portrait of President Grant as a General during the Civil War covers the lower left of the marker. The upper right has a portrait of "Richard T. Greener, an associate of Grant and the first black graduate of Harvard, supervised the fund-raising campaign that
General Grant at the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2016
3. General Grant at the Marker
Gen. Grant visited the memorial on the 150th anniversary of his promotion to the rank of 4-Star "General of the Army." Grant was the first American to achieve this rank.
collected $600,000 to build the memorial. The Harlem community has been actively involved with the memorial from its beginning." The lower right of the marker is a photo of U.S. Colored Troops from the Civil War.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This is a marker for the quarry where the granite for this memorial was obtained.
 
Also see . . .
1. General Grant National Memorial. National Park Service website. (Submitted on December 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Video Tour of the General Grant National Memorial. (Submitted on May 25, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. HeroesNotable PersonsWar, US Civil
 
General Grant Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 29, 2012
4. General Grant Memorial Marker
Marker at Grant's Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 29, 2012
5. Marker at Grant's Tomb
The General Grant National Memorial (Grant's Tomb) is seen here behind the marker.
Grant's Tomb in New York City image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
6. Grant's Tomb in New York City
Union Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant and his wife Julia Dent Grant were laid to rest in the General Grant Memorial in New York City.
Here lie the bodies of General Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
7. Here lie the bodies of General Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia.
General Grant at Vicksburg image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
8. General Grant at Vicksburg
This is one of three murals in the rotunda of the General Grant National Memorial. It depicts Gen. Grant during the siege of Vicksburg.
Generals Grant and Thomas in Chattanooga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
9. Generals Grant and Thomas in Chattanooga
Another mural in the rotunda of the General Grant National Memorial depicts Gen. Grant and Gen. Thomas at the Battle of Chattanooga.
Grant and Lee at Appomattox image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
10. Grant and Lee at Appomattox
The last mural in the General Grant National Memorial rotunda shows the meeting of Gens. Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee during the surrender ceremony at Appomattox.
Maj. Gen Edward O. C. Ord image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
11. Maj. Gen Edward O. C. Ord
Busts of five of Grant's fellow generals are displayed near his casket. This one is of Gen. O.C. Ord who played a major role in forcing the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox.
"Rock of Chickamauga" image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
12. "Rock of Chickamauga"
Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas achieved one of the most decisive victories of the war In the Franklin-Nashville Campaign of 1864, destroying the army of Confederate General John Bell Hood, at the Battle of Nashville.
Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
13. Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman
Gen. Sherman served under Grant in 1862 and 1863 during the campaigns that led to the fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River and the defeat the Confederate armies at Chattanooga. In 1864, Sherman succeeded Grant as Commander of the Union forces in the west.
Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
14. Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson
Gen. McPherson was killed at the Battle of Atlanta, the second highest ranking Union officer killed during the war and the only commander of a Union army to die in the field.
Gen. Philip Sheridan image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2006
15. Gen. Philip Sheridan
Grant transferred Gen. Sheridan from command of an infantry division in the Western Theater to lead the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac in the East.
Funeral of General Grant image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 23, 2014
16. Funeral of General Grant
Frederick Grant eulogizes his father as the elder Grant's grand daughter Julia and his wife look on.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 21, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,820 times since then and 52 times this year. Last updated on November 10, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1. submitted on December 1, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on March 29, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on July 24, 2016, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on March 29, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6, 7. submitted on December 1, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   8, 9, 10. submitted on May 28, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   11, 12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on March 25, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   16. submitted on July 23, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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