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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of Westminster in Greater London County, England, United Kingdom
 

Sir Ronald Ross

1857 - 1932

 
 
Sir Ronald Ross Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
1. Sir Ronald Ross Marker
Inscription.
Nobel Laureate
Discoverer of the
mosquito transmission
of malaria
lived here

 
Erected 1985 by Greater London Council.
 
Location. 51° 30.993′ N, 0° 8.764′ W. Marker is in City of Westminster, England, in Greater London County. Marker is at the intersection of Cavendish Square and Wigmore Street, on the left when traveling north on Cavendish Square. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 18 Cavendish Square, City of Westminster, England W1G 0PJ, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Josef Dallos (a few steps from this marker); George Edmund Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Sir Jonathan Hutchinson (within shouting distance of this marker); Herbert Henry Asquith (within shouting distance of this marker); Cavendish Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Sir Frederick Treves (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); Quintin Hogg (about 150 meters away); Sir George Frederic Still (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of Westminster.
 
Also see . . .  Ronald Ross. "Sir Ronald Ross KCB KCMG FRS FRCS (13 May 1857
Sir Ronald Ross Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
2. Sir Ronald Ross Marker - Wide View
Here both the Ross and Dallos markers are visible mounted to 18 Cavendish Square.
– 16 September 1932), was a British medical doctor who received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1902 for his work on the transmission of malaria, becoming the first British Nobel laureate, and the first born outside Europe. His discovery of the malarial parasite in the gastrointestinal tract of a mosquito in 1897 proved that malaria was transmitted by mosquitoes, and laid the foundation for the method of combating the disease. He was a polymath, writing a number of poems, published several novels, and composed songs. He was also an amateur artist and natural mathematician. He worked in the Indian Medical Service for 25 years. It was during his service that he made the groundbreaking medical discovery. After resigning from his service in India, he joined the faculty of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, and continued as Professor and Chairman of Tropical Medicine of the institute for 10 years. In 1926 he became Director-in-Chief of the Ross Institute and Hospital for Tropical Diseases, which was established in honour of his works. He remained there until his death." (Submitted on December 13, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Science & Medicine
 
Sir Ronald Ross image. Click for full size.
Walter Benington (photo courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery), circa 1925
3. Sir Ronald Ross
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 13, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 13, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 67 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 13, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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