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Oak Ridge in Anderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Oak Ridge – Secret City

 
 
Oak Ridge – Secret City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
1. Oak Ridge – Secret City Marker
Inscription. In November 1942, Army Engineers were ordered to build a town for 13,000 people. A year later their target grew to 42,000, and the actual population reached 75,000 in September 1945 – almost three times the cityís 2005 population. Shown on no maps, and known through the war not as Oak Ridge but as Clinton Engineer Works, it was truly a “Secret City”. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of Chicago produced an attractive design featuring neighborhood schools linked by winding streets along Black Oak Ridge. In 1943 Captain P.E. OíMeara was the first town manager, but with the population exploding that fall, the Army contracted with Turner Construction of New York to come in and manage city operations. The Roane–Anderson Company set up by Turner became the landlord, eventually renting and maintaining more the 35,000 housing units. The company also managed 17 eating places serving 40,000 meals a day, a 500-person housekeeper service, the Guest House hotel, a laundry, garbage pick-up, coal delivery, a bus service for up to 120,000 riders a day, a railroad with five locomotives, a chicken farm, and a 3,000-cattle farm. Roane–Anderson also brought in 200 businesses and ships for residents. Because of the war, everything was in short supply, so Roane–Andersonís 10,000 employees had an unpopular job, but handled it very
Oak Ridge – Secret City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
2. Oak Ridge – Secret City Marker
well. Their Recreational & Welfare Association, assisted by a council of 14 citizens, improved the residentsí quality of life by sponsoring 17 different sports, four recreation halls, two community centers, eight playgrounds, and, by 1945, meeting places for some 75 different clubs and societies, as well as 22 churches.

Erected by the City of Oak Ridge in June 2005 In Honor of the 75,000 Patriots from All Over America Who Lived and Worked in the Secret City from 1942 to 1949.
 
Erected 2005 by City of Oak Ridge.
 
Location. 36° 0.819′ N, 84° 15.473′ W. Marker is in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in Anderson County. Marker is on Oak Ridge Turnpike (Tennessee Route 95), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker located in Alvin K. Bissell Park. Marker is in this post office area: Oak Ridge TN 37830, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1943 (here, next to this marker); X-10 – The Clinton Laboratories (here, next to this marker); ORINS / ORAU (here, next to this marker); 1942 (here, next to this marker); 1945 (here, next to this marker); Construction Workers

Secret City Commemorative Walk image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
3. Secret City Commemorative Walk
(here, next to this marker); 1949 (here, next to this marker); Oak Ridge and the Manhattan Project (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oak Ridge.
 
Also see . . .
1. Oak Ridge, TN. (Submitted on January 6, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
2. Secret City Commemorative Walk. (Submitted on January 6, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. Science & MedicineSettlements & SettlersWar, World II
 
Secret City Commemorative Walk image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
4. Secret City Commemorative Walk
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 6, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Last updated on January 12, 2018, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 6, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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