Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Indianola in Calhoun County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Indianola

 
 
Indianola Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, July 21, 2018
1. Indianola Marker
Inscription. Many currents of the mainstream of Texas history flow in this onetime port. Pineda explored the coast in 1519 and La Salle planted a settlement near here in 1685. Once an Indian trading point, it was a major seaport from 1844 to 1875. Texas colonists, including Germans led by Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels, entered through Indianola. Forty-niners, supplies for frontier forts, and experimental Army camels were landed here.

During the Civil War Indianola and Fort Esperanza, which controlled the gateway to Indianola through Pass Cavallo, were objectives of Federal blockading vessels. Pass Cavallo, ten miles south, was one of several entrances to the inside waterway created by Matagorda Peninsula and the offshore islands extending to the Rio Grande. To deny Confederate use of this waterway for commerce through Mexico the Federals had to seize control of these entrances.

Before Confederate defenses at Fort Esperanza were completed, two Federal steamers slipped through Pass Cavallo to Indianola and on October 31, 1862 demanded the surrender of Lavaca (now Port Lavaca) to the northwest. The Confederate command refused, stood off the naval guns with land batteries, and forced the withdrawal of the Federal ships.

Federal forces attacked Fort Esperanza November 22, 1863. The Confederates withstood the assault of naval
Indianola Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Walker, October 18, 2012
2. Indianola Marker
and land forces for six days then spiked their guns, destroyed their magazines, and withdrew to the mainland. Indianola then fell December 23. On Christmas Eve, Federal and Confederate forces clashed at Norris Bridge, eight miles north. Two days later Lavaca was occupied and the entire Matagorda-Lavaca Bay area remained in Federal control until the war's end.

Indianola was partially destroyed by a hurricane in 1875 and completely destroyed by another in 1886.

A memorial to Texans who served the Confederacy.
 
Erected 1963 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 2642.)
 
Location. 28° 31.665′ N, 96° 30.547′ W. Marker is in Indianola, Texas, in Calhoun County. Marker is on State Highway 316 half a mile south of North Ocean Drive, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. The monument/historical marker is located on the beach side of State 316. Behind the marker is the prominent granite memorial to Acadian explorer and settler Rene Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. On the Powderhorn Lake side of 316 opposite the monuments is a picnic pull out. State 316 ends into residential roads less than a mile past. Marker is in this post office area: Port Lavaca TX 77979, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the
Indianola Marker image. Click for full size.
By Zacharias Beau T, March 6, 2011
3. Indianola Marker
A cholera outbreak was the first morbid era in Indianola. The Union bombardment and occupation added to stresses on the town's heritage. When post-war Federal occupation finally ended in 1875, the devastating hurricane that year killed more than three hundred. Dozens more lives were lost eleven years later in another storm. Within forty years of Indianola's history it was almost a ghost town.
crow flies. Rene Robert Cavelier Sieur de la Salle (within shouting distance of this marker); The Great Camel Experiment (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mrs. Angelina Bell Peyton Eberly (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Chihuahua Road (approx. one mile away); Site of the Town of Indianola (approx. one mile away); Zimmerman Cemetery (approx. 2.4 miles away); Olivia (approx. 8 miles away); Olivia Cemetery (approx. 9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Indianola.
 
More about this marker. When Texas initiated the current historical marker program in 1962, the design of the markers was slightly different than what eventually became the standard design. The markers were larger and featured elaborate scroll work around the text. Approximately 20 of these markers were placed between 1962 and 1964, when the current marker design was adopted. This marker was the 5th marker in that initial series, as designated by the number 5 found on the marker's base. The marker numbers disappeared in new design and the THC eventually went with a completely different numbering scheme for the markers.
 
Regarding Indianola. Indianola was once incorporated. The victim of countless strong Gulf hurricanes the majority of the old sites of Indianola are under the surface of Matagorda
Indianola Marker with LaSalle Monument in the distance image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Walker, October 18, 2012
4. Indianola Marker with LaSalle Monument in the distance
Bay. An unincorporated community of seasonal homes and some locals remain.
 
Also see . . .  Indianola, TX - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on July 23, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. DisastersSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Indianola Marker with La Salle Monument in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, July 21, 2018
5. Indianola Marker with La Salle Monument in the Background
Matagorda Bay image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
6. Matagorda Bay
View from near marker looking NW along shore of Matagorda Bay
Matagorda Bay image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
7. Matagorda Bay
View from near marker looking SE along shore of Matagorda Bay
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 24, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 24, 2011, by Zacharias Beau T of Alpine, Texas. This page has been viewed 911 times since then and 62 times this year. Last updated on July 23, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. Photos:   1. submitted on July 23, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.   2. submitted on November 22, 2012, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.   3. submitted on June 24, 2011, by Zacharias Beau T of Alpine, Texas.   4. submitted on November 22, 2012, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.   5. submitted on July 23, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.   6, 7. submitted on July 5, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement