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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winnsboro in Fairfield County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Mount Olivet Church

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
Mount Olivet Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, December 15, 2008
1. Mount Olivet Church Marker
Inscription. Organized before 1785, this Presbyterian Church was originally known as Wolf Pit Church, later as Wateree, and was finally named Mt. Olivet in 1800. The Reverend William Martin, Covenanter minister licensed by the Reformed Presbytery of Scotland, was an early minister here. The present house of worship was completed in 1869.
 
Erected 1975 by The Congregation. (Marker Number 20-13/202.)
 
Location. 34° 27.88′ N, 81° 2.016′ W. Marker is near Winnsboro, South Carolina, in Fairfield County. Marker is on Mobley Highway (State Highway 20-20) 0.3 miles west of State Highway 200, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Winnsboro SC 29180, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Graveyard Of The Richmond Covenanter Church Reformed Presbyterian (approx. 5.6 miles away); Wynne Dee (approx. 6.3 miles away); Mt. Zion Society (approx. 6.3 miles away); James Wilson Hudson (approx. 6.3 miles away); South East Asia (approx. 6.3 miles away); World War (approx. 6.3 miles
Mount Olivet Church Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, December 15, 2008
2. Mount Olivet Church Stone Marker
away); Confederate Dead of Fairfield County (approx. 6.3 miles away); British Headquarters (approx. 6.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winnsboro.
 
Regarding Mount Olivet Church. Mount Olivet Presbyterian Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. This church is also one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

William Martin, the first Reformed Presbyterian pastor to settle in the South, organized this congregation in 1773 under the name Wolf Pen or Wolf Pit. The first meeting house, seven miles north of Winnsboro, was a log structure. Martin, brought before Lord Cornwallis in 1780 for preaching treason against the British, asserted, "The Declaration of Independence is but a reiteration of what our Covenanting Fathers have always maintained," and was released. In the 1790s the church was known as Wateree
Mount Olivet Church image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, December 15, 2008
3. Mount Olivet Church
after nearby Wateree Creek. In 1800 the congregation moved to the present site and took the name Mount Olivet. The present building, built of brick and covered with stucco, was constructed in 1869, with a gallery at the back for "colored" members.

 
Also see . . .
1. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. (Submitted on December 15, 2008, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
2. Mount Olivet Church (pdf file). National Register of Historic Places datasheet. Statement of significance for this church (Submitted on August 16, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. National Register of Historic Places:
Mount Olivet Presbyterian Church ** (added 1986 - Building - #86001523) •
Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering •
Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown •
Architectural Style: No Style Listed •
Area of Significance: Architecture •
Period of Significance: 1850-1874 •
Owner: Private •
Historic Function: Funerary, Religion •
Historic Sub-function: Cemetery, Religious Structure •
Current Function: Funerary, Religion •
Current Sub-function: Cemetery, Religious Structure •
    — Submitted January 13, 2011.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & Religion
 
Mount Olivet Church image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, December 15, 2008
4. Mount Olivet Church
Mount Olivet Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, December 15, 2008
5. Mount Olivet Church Cemetery
Mount Olivet Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, December 15, 2008
6. Mount Olivet Church Cemetery
Mount Olivet Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Ricky D. Smith, September 23, 2009
7. Mount Olivet Church Cemetery
Mount Olivet Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Ricky D. Smith, September 23, 2009
8. Mount Olivet Church Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 16, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 15, 2008, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,034 times since then and 47 times this year. Last updated on August 16, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 15, 2008, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on March 12, 2011, by Ricky D. Smith of Amarillo, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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