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Parkton in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Virginia Hall

 
 
Virginia Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 23, 2018
1. Virginia Hall Marker
Inscription.  Highly effective undercover agent during WWII. Declared by Gestapo the most dangerous Allied spy. Grew up at Box Horn Farm nearby. Hunting accident forced partial amputation of leg, barring her from a career in the U.S. Foreign Service. She played a significant role in the Allied victory in France while serving in extended covert activities. In 1945 she received the distinguished service cross for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy.
 
Erected 2018 by Maryland Historical Trust & Maryland State Highway Administration.
 
Location. 39° 39.205′ N, 76° 39.238′ W. Marker is in Parkton, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker is on York Road (Maryland Route 45) south of Stablers Church Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located in a grassy median strip on the west side of the highway. Marker is at or near this postal address: 19308 York Road, Parkton MD 21120, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fosters "Masemore" Mill (approx. 3.4 miles away); Freeland
Virginia Hall Marker (<i>tall view; looking north along York Road</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 23, 2018
2. Virginia Hall Marker (tall view; looking north along York Road)
(approx. 4 miles away); Mason and Dixon Line (approx. 4.7 miles away); Mason and Dixon Mile Stone (approx. 4.7 miles away); Black Horse Tavern (approx. 5.8 miles away); Summit Grove (approx. 6.2 miles away in Pennsylvania); Gorsuch Tavern (approx. 6.4 miles away); All Aboard! (approx. 6˝ miles away in Pennsylvania).
 
Also see . . .
1. Baltimore County marker dedicated to World War II spy honors real-life 'wonder woman'. Lisa Kraus of the State Highway Administration, Virginia Hall's niece Lorna Catling, and great-niece Linda Catling, at the dedication of a historical marker along York Road for Hall, a Baltimore native and WWII-era spy. “The Limping Lady” — a nickname she received after losing part of her leg in a hunting accident — was revered by the Allies but hated by the Gestapo. Hall coordinated agents, sent covert messages to Allied operatives, helped establish safe houses and became such a thorn in the side of the German leadership that she was labeled “the most dangerous of all Allied spies.” She worked with the State Department, the French Ambulance Service, the British Special Operations Executive, and the OSS, and in 1945 was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross — the only civilian woman
Virginia Hall Marker (<i>wide view; looking north along York Road</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 23, 2018
3. Virginia Hall Marker (wide view; looking north along York Road)
to earn such an honor for WWII service. She later joined the Central Intelligence Agency, and had a lengthy post-war career. (Submitted on August 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Virginia Hall (1906-1982), World War II Spy for the Allies. After the war, President Truman wanted to make public the award she was to be given, but Hall refused. She wanted to remain in her line of work. She did not want her identity revealed. Instead, in a private ceremony at the OSS office on September 27, 1945, Virginia Hall was given the Distinguished Service Cross award, making her the only American woman and the first civilian to be awarded this honor during World War II. After the war, the OSS disbanded but its operations were folded into a new agency, the Central Intelligence Agency. Hall worked at the CIA offices until mandatory retirement at age 60. (Submitted on August 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Nazi Most Wanted Allied Spy - Virginia Hall. In early 1944, she worked in disguise as an old woman farmhand. Her missions included training French Resistance battalions, organizing sabotage operations, supplying intelligence on the German Army, radio operator and courier, locating drop zones for the RAF, and eventually working with a Jedburgh team to sabotage German military movements in coordination with the D-Day invasion. Again, Hall avoided capture, despite the German Gestapo naming her the most dangerous spy and hanging posters offering a reward for the "Limping Lady" dead or alive. (Submitted on August 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryPatriots & PatriotismWar, World IIWomen
 
More. Search the internet for Virginia Hall.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 3, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 20, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 144 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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