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Women Topic

 
Marietta Johnson Marker image, Touch for more information
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2019
Marietta Johnson Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT WITH USA FIRST
1Alabama (Baldwin County), Fairhope — Marietta Johnson
Marietta Johnson, world leader of the Progressive Education Movement founded the School of Organic Education in 1907. The school, which demonstrated her philosophy, attracted intellectuals and artists. Her work is a reminder of Fairhope’s . . . — Map (db m128888) HM
2Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Women's Veterans MemorialAlabama State Veterans Memorial Cemetery
Dedicated to all women veterans who have served, sacrificed and suffered for our nation. Your patriotism and courage are greatly appreciated and will never be forgotten. [Seals of the U.S. Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps & . . . — Map (db m100943) WM
3Alabama (Baldwin County), Summerdale — Sonora Community / Sonora School and Community Hall
Sonora Community The community of Sonora was named in 1901 by the wife of the first postmaster, G.L. Sharretts. Situated near Red Hill Ford on Baker Branch and the intersection of travel routes between Silverhill, Magnolia Springs, Marlow . . . — Map (db m130878) HM
4Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Exploit of Murphree SistersIncident of May 1, 1863 during Streight (USA) -Forrest (CSA) Campaign.
Three prowling Union soldiers invaded home of sister-in-law of Celia and Winnie Mae Murphree taking food, drink; killing two colts. When soldiers fell asleep, these two young girls took rifles, marched soldiers to headquarters of General . . . — Map (db m83226) HM
5Alabama (Chilton County), Marbury — Memorial Hall1904 – 1924
On this site stood "Memorial Hall," the two story, log and shingle administrative and social center of the Alabama Confederate Soldiers' Home. Construction was partially financed by individuals from across the state who purchased "Memorial Logs" for . . . — Map (db m129410) HM
6Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — At This Well
Annie Sullivan Macy revealed the mystery of language to seven year old Helen Keller by spelling the word W-A-T-E-R into her hand as water flowed over the other hand — Map (db m106094) HM
7Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Ivy GreenBirthplace of Helen Keller
The Family Home of Captain Arthur M. & Kate Adams Keller was built 1820, being the second house erected in Tuscumbia. Here on June 27, 1880 was born America's First Lady of Courage Helen Adams Keller — Map (db m29089) HM
8Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Honoring: Amelia Boynton Robinson - Marie Foster
The Selma-Montgomery March "Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965 Mothers of the Civil Rights Movement Before and Beyond the Bridge Didn't Let Nothing Turn Them Around! Presented by The Evelyn Gibson Lowery . . . — Map (db m111691) HM
9Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — White - Force Cottage
This Italianate style cottage was built in 1859 by C. B. and Martha Todd White. Mrs. White, half sister of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln, was an outspoken Southern patriot, who subjected the Lincolns to severe criticism, when the Northern press accused her . . . — Map (db m38274) HM
10Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Colonel Hood House
This stately Classic Revival house, built c. 1904, was the residence of Colonel Oliver Roland Hood (1867-1951), eminent Gadsden attorney and civic leader. Colonel Hood was one of the three incorporators of Alabama Power Company in 1906 and author of . . . — Map (db m83732) HM
11Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Emma SansomMay 2, 1863
Here girl heroine led Forrest’s (CSA) men across Black Creek on way to capture Streight’s (USA) raiders. This saved the railroad supplying Confederate Army of Tennessee. — Map (db m39131) HM
12Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Emma Sansom
Here on the morning of May 2, 1863 Emma Sansom braved the fire of Colonel Streight’s sharpshooters as she guided General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his gallant cavalrymen to the ford at this spot where they crossed Black Creek, at that time a raging . . . — Map (db m39340) HM
13Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Emma Sansom Monument
In memory of the Gadsden Alabama girl heroine Emma Sansom, who when the bridge across Black Creek had been burned by the enemy, mounted behind Gen. Forest and showed him a ford where his command crossed. He pursued and captured that enemy and . . . — Map (db m12297) HM
14Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Sisters Missionary Servants Of The Most Blessed Trinity
On January 25, 1925 the Sisters acquired the 25 - bed Gadsden General Hospital on Chestnut Street and renamed it Holy Name of Jesus Hospital. The Hospital grew under the leadership of the Founders, Father Thomas A. Judge, C. M. and Mother Mary . . . — Map (db m39141) HM
15Alabama (Geneva County), Geneva — Emma Knox Kenan LibraryFounded 1904
Mrs. Emma Knox Kenan established the library at the request of school superintendent W.W. Benson in a small cloak room of the Geneva School. The library was financed by subscriptions, book rentals and fund raisers. The property where the library now . . . — Map (db m131869) HM
16Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Carrie A. Tuggle1858 - 1924
In Tribute to Carrie A. Tuggle 1858 - 1924 Scholar, Teacher and Christian. A life of unselfish service to the troubled and the homeless black boys and girls. In 1903, she founded a school and orphanage, the Tuggle . . . — Map (db m27391) HM
17Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Dr. Ruth J. Jackson1898 - 1982
Dedicated to Dr. Ruth J. Jackson 1898-1982 This woman of strength and vision graduated from the Poro School of Cosmetology, the first black registered school in the State of Alabama. At the vanguard of the Civil Rights Movement, she was . . . — Map (db m27090) HM
18Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Pauline Bray Fletcher1878 - 1970
In Tribute to Pauline Bray Fletcher 1878 - 1970 The First Black Registered Nurse of Alabama Through self-sacrifice, perseverance founded in 1926 Camp Pauline Bray Fletcher. Renewing the faith and the good health of all black . . . — Map (db m27393) HM
19Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Walker Memorial Church
In 1818 before Alabama, Jefferson County, Elyton or Birmingham existed, The Elyton Methodist Church was established on Center Street. It was moved to 14 Second Avenue, and in 1909, to its present site. Renamed in 1910 for Corilla Porter Walker . . . — Map (db m24348) HM
20Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Ellen Dorrit HoffleitCity of Florence Walk of Honor
Dr. Ellen D. Hoffleit, celebrated worldwide for her many contributions to astronomy, discovered more than 1,200 variable stars. She authored Yale Bright Star Catalogue which is used in almost every astronomical observatory in the world. . . . — Map (db m99381) HM
21Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Lin Dunn
Serving as head coach in women's collegiate basketball, 1970-1996, Lin Dunn became a 17-year coach in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) and was inducted into the WNBA Hall of Fame in 2014. Inducted 2018 City of . . . — Map (db m138779) HM
22Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Locust Dell Academy1834~1843
On this site Nicholas Marcellus Hentz conducted a girls' school. Native of Metz, France, Hentz was a painter, entomologist, author, and was once a professor at University of North Alabama. Experimenting with silkworms, he planted groves of mulberry . . . — Map (db m84029) HM
23Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Lynn Middleton SibleyCity of Florence Walk of Honor
Devoting her career to reducing childbirth mortality among women and newborns across the world, Lynn Sibley developed a 21st century community-based model for maternal and newborn health in low-resource countries. — Map (db m84031) HM
24Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Natalie ChaninCity of Florence Walk of Honor
Beginning in the year 2000, the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum in New York and the National Textile Museum in Washington, among others have honored the fabric and clothing designs of internationally known Natalie Chanin. — Map (db m99376) HM
25Alabama (Lauderdale County), Rogersville — Bettie Anne Highway
The home-place of Bettie Anne Springer-Thornton lies 1.6 miles north on the east side of Lauderdale County Road 51. This home was originally a one-room log cabin, built between 1892 and 1894 by Levi Patrick Thornton. Two rooms and a dog-trot were . . . — Map (db m141966) HM
26Alabama (Lauderdale County), Waterloo — Edith Newman CulverMemorial Museum — 1872~1995 —
The Newman House was restored and presented in 1995 to the citizens of Waterloo by Ezra Lee Culver, as a memorial to his wife, Edith Elizabeth Newman Culver. Built in 1872 by Hiram L. and Julia Ann Young Richardson. This house was purchased in . . . — Map (db m29276) HM
27Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — Harris-Simpson Home
Side A This circa 1820 house is thought to be one of the oldest houses in Courtland. Occupying a lot platted by the Courtland Land Company in 1818, the house faces North toward what was once the main Tuscumbia Road. Dr. Jack Shackelford . . . — Map (db m84306) HM
28Alabama (Lawrence County), Hillsboro — Home of Annie Wheeler
Born July 31, 1868 ~ Died April 10, 1955 Daughter of General Joseph Wheeler Gallantly served her country three times on foreign soil. Volunteer nurse, Santiago, Cuba~1898. Spanish~American War and Manila, P.I. ~1899 during Philippine . . . — Map (db m29558) HM
29Alabama (Lawrence County), Moulton — Anne Newport Royall
Born 11 June 1769, in Maryland and married 18 Nov 1797, Anne Royall became a wealthy widow upon her Revolutionary War Veteran husband's death in 1813. However, her husband's family filed an ultimately successful suit for his estate. While she waited . . . — Map (db m84309) HM
30Alabama (Lowndes County), Lowndesboro — Viola Liuzzo
In memory of our sister Viola Liuzzo who gave her life in the struggle for the right to vote... March 25, 1965 Presented by SCLC/WOMEN Evelyn G. Lowery, National Convener - 1991 - The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Joseph E. . . . — Map (db m85461) HM
31Alabama (Macon County), Notasulga — Birthplace of Zora Neale HurstonNotasulga, Alabama — Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) —
Side 1 Celebrated author Zora Neale Hurston was born in Notasulga on January 7, 1891. Her parents, John Hurston and Lucy Potts met here, at the Macedonia Baptist Church. but moved to Eatonville, Florida where Zora grew up. Through . . . — Map (db m95110) HM
32Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — 10 — Rosa Parks — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (1913 – 2005) was an iconic activist during the mid twentieth century civil rights movement. Born in Tuskegee, Parks later moved with her mother to Pine Level located near Montgomery, Alabama. She was encouraged by . . . — Map (db m134670) HM
33Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 1 — Amelia Boynton Robinson — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Amelia Boynton Robinson (1911 2015) was a voting rights activist and civil rights icon. Born on August 18, 1911, in Savannah, Georgia, she received her bachelor's degree in home economics from Tuskegee University in 1927. In 1934, Mrs. Boynton . . . — Map (db m139890) HM
34Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 6 — Jessie Parkhurst Guzman — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
Jessie Parkhurst Guzman (1898-1996) was born in Savannah, Georgia, educated at Howard University (BA, 1919) and Columbia University (MA, 1924), and worked at Tuskegee University for over forty years. During Guzman's time at Tuskegee University, she . . . — Map (db m139885) HM
35Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — 3 — The Tuskegee Institute Advancement League — The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail —
The Tuskegee Institute Advancement League (TIAL) was a student-based organization started in 1963 and reorganized in 1965 during the school integration crises. It originally sought to gain a measure of academic freedom through input with the . . . — Map (db m139886) HM
36Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — White Hall1910
Named in honor of Alexander Moss White of Brooklyn, New York, with funds donated by his children. This structure opened fall 1909. The building was officially dedicated in January 1910 was a dormitory for women. A bronze tower with clock was added . . . — Map (db m101906) HM
37Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Dallas (Optimist) Park / (Dallas) Optimist Park
Dallas (Optimist) Park 1928-1949 Built in 1928, Dallas Park served as the baseball field for the Dallas Mill teams coached by H.E. "Hub” Myhand, who came to Huntsville in 1927 as physical director for Dallas Manufacturing Co. Until the . . . — Map (db m154279) HM
38Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Howard Weeden Home
Built 1819 by H. C. Bradford, this home was later owned by John Read, John McKinley, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court (1837-1852), Bartley M. Lowe, M. C. Betts and Marie Howard Weeden (1846-1905) whose poetry and paintings preserve nineteenth . . . — Map (db m27841) HM
39Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Huntsville Female Seminary
The Alabama legislature authorized the Seminary on January 15, 1831. A board of trustees owned stock in the enterprise. It replaced the Huntsville Female Academy organized in 1830. The new teaching staff, hired by Trustee James G. Birney, were . . . — Map (db m154269) HM
40Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Monte Sano Female Seminary
Monte Sano Female Seminary founded by The Rev. and Mrs. James Rowe opened February, 1830 closed December, 1833 Course of Instruction included "English, Classical, Scientific, and Ornamental branches of Education usually . . . — Map (db m154276) HM
41Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Tallulah Bankhead / I. Schiffman Building1902-1968 / Birthplace of Tallulah Bankhead — Alabama’s Best-Known Actress —
Side A Tallulah Bankhead was the toast of the London theatre in the 1920's, and nationally renowned for her dramatic roles in “The Little Foxes” (1939), “The Skin of Our Teeth” (1942), the movie . . . — Map (db m27850) HM
42Alabama (Marengo County), Demopolis — The Demopolis Opera House / Lillian Hellman AndThe Little Foxes
The Demopolis Opera House In 1876, the town of Demopolis leased the former Presbyterian Church, a classic brick structure built in 1843 and occupied by federal troops during Reconstruction, to the Demopolis Opera Association. The . . . — Map (db m38009) HM
43Alabama (Marshall County), Grant — Kate Duncan Smith - Daughters of the American Revolution School
(Side A) In 1924, the Alabama Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) established Kate Duncan Smith School to provide a patriotic education dedicated to academic achievement and service to "God, Home, and Country" for . . . — Map (db m33308) HM
44Alabama (Marshall County), Grant — Pennsylvania Bell Tower
Built as a water tower in 1937 by her husband in honor of Mrs. Harper Donelson Sheppard, Pennsylvania State Regent 1935-1938, and created a Bell Tower in 1973 upon the installation of a Carillion by the Pennsylvania Daughters in honor of Mrs. Harold . . . — Map (db m76232) HM
45Alabama (Marshall County), Guntersville — John Gunter
. . . — Map (db m33306) HM
46Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 10 — Christian Benevolent Funeral Home
Mrs. Pearl Johnson Madison was one of the early African-American women to own a funeral home in the state of Alabama in 1928. The funeral home and burial association served the African-American community when white mortuaries would not. Today, the . . . — Map (db m111310) HM
47Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — The Convent of Mercy
On this site in 1884 the Sisters of Mercy established the Convent of Mercy. In 1908 the front building, the convent, was constructed and in 1927 the adjacent school building was occupied by pupils attending Convent of Mercy Academy. The school . . . — Map (db m86584) HM
48Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Vivian Malone JonesJuly 15, 1942 - October 13, 2005
Side 1 On May 30, 1965, Vivian Malone, became the first African-American to graduate from the University of Alabama. To achieve admission at the all-White university, she was forced to confront then Governor, George C. Wallace, in what has . . . — Map (db m111392) HM
49Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Aurelia Eliscera Shines BrowderCivil Rights Pioneer
Side 1 Aurelia Eliscera Shines Browder was born January 29, 1919, in Montgomery, Alabama. She graduated with honors in 1956 from Alabama State Teachers College (now Alabama State University). In April 1955, Browder's refusal to give up . . . — Map (db m71349) HM
50Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Georgia GilmoreFebruary 5, 1920 - March 3, 1990
Georgia Gilmore, cited as a “solid energetic boycott participant and supporter.” Lived in this house during the days of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Once arrested on a bus, Gilmore was ardent in her efforts to raise funds for the Movement . . . — Map (db m28197) HM
51Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Here Stood Mrs. Rosa ParksMother of the Civil Rights Movement
Commemorating the centennial Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated Here stood Mrs. Rosa Parks Mother of the Civil Rights Movement and honorary member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. where she boarded the Montgomery . . . — Map (db m85986) HM
52Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Juliette Hampton Morgan / Montgomery City-County Public Library
(side 1) Juliette Hampton Morgan Juliette Hampton Morgan was a white Montgomery, Alabama librarian whose privileged upbringing seemed unlikely to produce the determined civil rights activist that she became. Her letters to the . . . — Map (db m71258) HM
53Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Ladies Memorial Association
To the Ladies Memorial Association formed in this auditorium April 1866 for the purpose of ministering to the living Confederate soldier and to keep in remembrance his high principles and heroic deeds. . . . — Map (db m71277) HM
54Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Lower Dexter Park
History Happened Here The City of Montgomery built this public park on one of the lots occupied by the Montgomery Fair Department Store. Rosa Parks was an assistant to the tailor for Montgomery Fair. On December 1, 1955, Mrs. Parks . . . — Map (db m121435) HM
55Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Rosa Louise McCauley Parks / The Bus Stop
Side A A Lady of Courage Born in Tuskegee, AL on February 4, 1913, to James McCauley, a carpenter, and Leona Edwards, a teacher. Moved with mother and brother to Pine Level, AL after parents' separation. Enrolled in Mrs. White's School . . . — Map (db m36503) HM
56Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Rosa Louise ParksShe sat down - So we can stand up — February 4, 1913 - October 24, 2005 —
Mother of the modern day civil rights movement — Map (db m91278) HM
57Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Rosa Parks Branch Library / Bertha Pleasant Williams
Side 1 Rosa Parks Branch Library Second public library for blacks in City of Montgomery, this building opened in 1960 as Montgomery Branch Library on Cleveland Avenue. Designed by architect James Miller Davis, it served the black . . . — Map (db m71388) HM
58Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Rosa Parks Montgomery Bus Boycott / Hank Williams Alabama Troubadour
Side A At the bus stop on this site on December 1, 1955, Mrs. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to boarding whites. This brought about her arrest, conviction, and fine. The Boycott began December 5, the day of Parks’ trial, as a . . . — Map (db m86422) HM
59Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Rosa Parks Statue
Rosa M. Parks (1913-2005) was arrested on a Montgomery bus December 1, 1955 for refusing to relinquish her seat to a white passenger. Her arrest, which happened 2 blocks west on Montgomery Street, sparked the 381-day Montgomery Bus Boycott, which . . . — Map (db m143325) HM
60Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — The Jackson-Community House/The Montgomery City Federation of Women’s Clubs
(side 1) The Jackson-Community House In 1853, Jefferson Franklin Jackson, a native Alabamian and U.S. Attorney for the Alabama Middle District, built this two-story clapboard home originally with a dogtrot pattern. A Whig Party . . . — Map (db m71236) HM
61Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — Carolyn Cortner SmithFemale Architect Pioneer / Designed Delano Park Structures
Born in 1894 in Normandy, Tennessee, Carolyn Cortner was raised in the Courtland area of Lawrence County, Alabama. She attended Ward-Belmont College in Tennessee. She married Wilburn Smith in 1912. She did not attend formal architecture school . . . — Map (db m27814) HM
62Alabama (Perry County), Marion — The Marion Female Seminary
One of the earliest colleges for women in America. Founded in 1835, was the first of four colleges established in Marion,“The Athens of Alabama.” This building, erected in 1850, contained the art studio of Nicola Marschall, who . . . — Map (db m70068) HM
63Alabama (Pike County), Troy — Janice Hawkins Park"An excellent wife is the crown of her husband."Proverbs 12:4 —
Janice Hawkins Park was named in honor of the First Lady of Troy University, a devoted wife and loving mother, whose work benefited Troy in the fine arts, service to students, internationalization of the University, and support of military veterans. . . . — Map (db m111581) HM
64Alabama (Randolph County), Roanoke — Roanoke Doll Factory1900-1925
Ella Gannt Smith, artist, inventor, manufactured in this building the famous Roanoke Dolls. The dolls, completely handmade, featured a head molded of plaster of Paris enclosed in a tight cotton fabric cut and stuffed to resemble body, hands and . . . — Map (db m11730) HM
65Alabama (Russell County), Phenix City — "Emperor" Brims, Mary Musgrove and Chief William McIntosh — Creek Heritage Trail —
Coweta was the home of many influential Creek leaders, including three individuals who figured prominently in the history of the Creek people; "Emperor” Brims, Mary Musgrove, Chief William McIntosh. The Coweta chieftain Brims, who . . . — Map (db m101336) HM
66Alabama (Talladega County), Talladega — The Joiner Family
The distinguished Joiner family lived here in an imposing mansion, demolished in 1970. James H. Joiner: Pioneer in Talladega's progress while publisher, 1844-73, of one of Alabama's most influential newspapers - The Democratic Watchtower. . . . — Map (db m37220) HM
67Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Alabama Central Female College
After the seat of government was moved to Montgomery in 1847, the Tuscaloosa Capitol and its furnishings were deeded to the University of Alabama to be used for educational purposes. In 1857, the University Board of Trustees leased the building . . . — Map (db m29064) HM
68Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Amelia Gayle Gorgas1826-1913
Daughter of John Gayle, Governor of Alabama. Wife of Josiah Gorgas, Brigadier General, C. S. A. Mother of William Crawford Gorgas, Surgeon General, U. S. A. Untiring nurse in Confederate Hospitals, 1861-1865. First Historian Alabama Division, . . . — Map (db m33653) HM
69Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Autherine Lucy Foster
First African American to enroll at the University of Alabama following successful litigation under the historic 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling. She began classes on February 3, 1956; however, after three days of tumultuous demonstrations, . . . — Map (db m108342) HM
70Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Kappa Delta
Zeta Chapter of Kappa Delta first national Greek letter sorority at the University of Alabama Chapter installed March 12, 1904. First members initiated in the Sigma Nu Hall by Katherine Lovejoy of Theta Chapter at Randolph-Macon Woman's College. . . . — Map (db m28782) HM
71Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Malone Hood Plaza
The Autherine Lucy Clock Tower is dedicated to the sacrifice and commitment of a courageous individual who took a stand for change at a crucial time in the history of The University of Alabama. The open arches, which mirror the architecture of . . . — Map (db m37918) HM
72Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Margaret M. DuPont
Margaret McLeod DuPont was born and raised in Tuscaloosa and graduated from the University of Alabama with a degree in Home Economics Education. She worked as a secretary for the Vice President of Reichhold Chemical and as a Stenographer for Mayor . . . — Map (db m35380) HM
73Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — The Friedman Home
Built 1835 by Alfred Battle; purchased 1875 by Bernard Friedman; willed to the city of Tuscaloosa 1965 by Hugo Friedman. Traditionally a social and cultural center in Tuscaloosa, it was the residence of Virginia Tunstall Clay-Clopton, author of . . . — Map (db m35368) HM
74Alabama (Wilcox County), Camden — Wilcox Female Institute
Incorporated 1850 by James A. Tait, L. W. Mason, Joseph George and Associates Original Trustees: Col. J. C. Jones, Joseph George, Maj. M. M. Bonham, D. W. Sterrett, Col. C. C. Sellers, Dr. M. Reid, J. W. Bridges, Dr. Robert Irvin, and Maj. F. . . . — Map (db m68156) HM
75Alaska (Ketchikan Gateway Borough), Ketchikan — 20 Creek StreetCirca 1920
Beatrice Greene; the last working woman For half a century, this house, like so many on the Creek, was part of Ketchikan’s notorious red light district where both fish and men came upstream to spawn… the fish once, many of the men . . . — Map (db m112041) HM
76Alaska (Ketchikan Gateway Borough), Ketchikan — Dolly's HouseCirca 1905
Dolly Arthur… one of the Creek’s longest “working” residents This house was the home of Dolly Arthur, Ketchikan’s most famous “sporting woman.” From 1919 through the 1940s, it was also her place of business. . . . — Map (db m112038) HM
77Alaska, Skagway — Mollie Walsh1872-1902
Mollie was a resourceful and independent young woman with a wanderlust and love of frontiers. In 1890, she left home at 18 for Butte, Montana where she spent seven years. Landing in Skagway in 1897, Mollie became popular as a waitress and member of . . . — Map (db m72786) HM
78Arizona (Apache County), Springerville — 17 — Bertha Wahl Shooting
In 1899, 14 year old Bertha Wahl was murdered here by a shepherd. Just south of here was the original Becker Store. Beyond lie the graves of the Becker family. Due west stood Henry Springer's Mercantile. — Map (db m36647) HM
79Arizona (Apache County), Springerville — 28 — Madonna of the Trail
This 10 foot high, 5 ton statue cast by St. Louis sculptor August Leimbach is one of 12 identical monuments to the bold spirit of the pioneers erected in 1928-29 along the National Old Trails Road from Maryland to California. — Map (db m36380) HM
80Arizona (Cochise County), Sierra Vista — Carmichael House/Sierra Vista Realty301 North Garden Avenue — Built in 1927 —
The Carmichael House was built by William and Margaret Ziegan Carmichael on 131.05 acres. On December 11, 1911, Margaret, a single woman at the time, purchased the property from John and Ellen Reilly for $8,000. As the years passed, the Carmichael . . . — Map (db m27894) HM
81Arizona (Cochise County), Tombstone — 41 — HoptownChinese Section — 1879 —
In 1879 there were 11 people in Tombstone of Chinese descent. By 1882 there were 250. The area between 2nd and 3rd and Allen and Toughnut was the area where they lived and had businesses, commonly called "Hoptown". The Chinese ran laundries, . . . — Map (db m131096) HM
82Arizona (Cochise County), Willcox — Erickson Family CemeterySacred To the Memory of These Pioneers
They came when only the brave dared come: They stayed where only the valiant could stay. Born in Sweden. Americans by choice - not by accident of birth, they loved their adopted country and served her well. Neil Served five years in the . . . — Map (db m28368) HM
83Arizona (Cochise County), Willcox — The Willcox Women's Community Center
Was constructed by P. Howard Pregenzer and crew In Memory of P. Howard Pregenzer 1894-1980 Resident of Willcox, Arizona 1927-1980 Construction began in 1934 and completed in 1936 Construction sponsored by the City of Willcox, . . . — Map (db m28415) HM
84Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — A Days Work
Puebloan traditions reach far back in time and are the basis for the social organization portrayed here. What responsibilities might you have had in this community, given your age and gender? [Photo captions read] Hopi men plant and tend . . . — Map (db m61350) HM
85Arizona (Graham County), Safford — Womans Club of SaffordDedicated - 1937
National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m61512) HM
86Arizona (Maricopa County), Glendale — Glendale Woman's Club ClubhouseBuilt 1913
This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior Listed July 7, 1989 In 1901, a small group of pioneer women organized the Self Culture Club of Glendale with the . . . — Map (db m30478) HM
87Arizona (Maricopa County), Mesa — Arizonan Women Airforce Service Pilots – WASP
Commemorative Air Force Arizona Military Aviation Walk of Honor Proudly Recognizes Arizonan Women Airforce Service Pilots – WASP 1942 — 1944 “We live in the wind and sand … and our eyes are on the stars!” The . . . — Map (db m102898) HM WM
88Arizona (Maricopa County), Mesa — Mesa Woman's Club House
On March 9, 1917, fifty-three women, inspired by Margaret Wheeler Ross, past president, 1914-1916, of the General Federation of Women's Clubs of Arizona, chartered the "Woman's Club of Mesa". Since 1901, Federated Women's Clubs, an international . . . — Map (db m27554) HM
89Arizona (Maricopa County), Peoria — GFWC Peoria Woman's Club
In 1919, this building was constructed as a meeting place for the General Federation of Women's Clubs – Peoria Woman's Club. Originally located at the northwest corner of 83rd Avenue and Washington Street, the Clubhouse was restored and . . . — Map (db m30401) HM
90Arizona (Maricopa County), Phoenix — 344 — Arizona's Pioneer Women
Before 1875 hundreds of heroic women came to Arizona from the East and South. From this group came Arizona's first schoolteachers and the publisher of the first newspaper. In 1876 a group of pioneer women and their families came from the north, . . . — Map (db m27385) HM
91Arizona (Maricopa County), Tempe — Farmer - Goodwin MansionHistoric Site
Begun in 1885, this adobe house was completed in February 1886 by Hiram Bradford Farmer. Professor Farmer was the first principal and sole instructor of the newly founded Territorial Normal School, now Arizona State University. Unofficially the . . . — Map (db m27560) HM
92Arizona (Maricopa County), Tempe — Hayden HouseConstructed 1874
Tempe founder Charles Trumbull Hayden built a house of willow poles on this site in 1871 and erected an adobe home, store, and blacksmith shop during the next two years. He married Sallie Davis in Visalia, California, and brought her here in 1876. . . . — Map (db m27585) HM
93Arizona (Mohave County), Fredonia — 995 Miles of Wire — Pipe Spring National Monument —
A long line of juniper poles — like the one you see here — set 70 yards apart ended Pipe Spring’s isolation. From 1871 on, telegraph wire connected the ranch first to Utah and then to the outside world. By 1880 Mormon settlements from . . . — Map (db m149370) HM
94Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — Girls' Dormitory (120)
During the first decade of the Theodore Roosevelt School, girls were housed in the old fort hospital. Since the old barracks that housed the boys was inadequate, a new boys' dormitory was scheduled for construction in 1931. Before that construction . . . — Map (db m36878) HM
95Arizona (Navajo County), Taylor — Daughters of the Utah PioneersJane Hatch Camp dedicated in 1932
Construction began in 1930 by Jane Hatch, Lizzie Willis and Emma Kartchner. The building was neglected for several years and in the early 1950's seven couples agreed to save the home, which became the clubhouse for the 20-30 Club. On November 2, . . . — Map (db m36695) HM
96Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Convent Street
Named in 1869 for the convent located adjacent to San Augustín Cathedral. When the seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet finally arrived in 1870, they opened the city’s first parochial school for girls next to San Augustín. Three years later . . . — Map (db m69563) HM
97Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Convent Street
Named in 1869 for the convent located adjacent to San Augustín Cathedral. When the seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet finally arrived in 1870, they opened the city’s first parochial school for girls next to San Augustín. Three years later . . . — Map (db m69589) HM
98Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Convent Street
Named in 1869 for the convent located adjacent to San Augustín Cathedral. When the seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet finally arrived in 1870, they opened the city’s first parochial school for girls next to San Augustín. Three years later . . . — Map (db m69812) HM
99Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Infantry Barracks / Laundresses' Quarters
The infantry barracks (no longer in existence) were 75 feet north of the hospital. The one-story building, like all of the barracks at Fort Lowell, had walls 20 inches thick, a dirt roof, and a wooden porch. The barracks were 20 feet wide and 145 . . . — Map (db m100689) HM
100Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Temple Emanu-El
Jewish pioneers, among Arizona's earliest settlers, began arriving in the 1850s and for half a century they worshipped in private homes and rented quarters. In 1904, the Hebrew Ladies Aid Society, now the Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El, . . . — Map (db m83237) HM

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Oct. 24, 2020