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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
McEwensville in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Warrior Run Church

American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site

 
 
Warrior Run Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 22, 2015
1. Warrior Run Church Marker
Inscription. Named for Indian occupation of the region. Presbyterian landmark. A log church was here in 1789. The present building erected in 1835. Restored in 1947 by Warrior Run Chapter D.A.R., aided by descendants and friends.
 
Erected 1947 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. (Marker Number 249.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 41° 5.874′ N, 76° 48.45′ W. Marker is in McEwensville, Pennsylvania, in Northumberland County. Marker is on 8th Street Drive just east of Susquehanna Trail (Pennsylvania Route 1007). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Ewensville PA 17749, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Col. Matthew Smith (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Freeland (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Freeland (about 700 feet away); Widow Catherine Smith (approx. 3.7 miles away); Milton's Early Park and Recreation Programs (approx. 5.9 miles away); "Remembrance of Things Past"
Warrior Run Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 22, 2015
2. Warrior Run Church Marker
(approx. 5.9 miles away); The Turbot Hills Golf Club (approx. 5.9 miles away); The Milton Fair (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in McEwensville.
 
Regarding Warrior Run Church. Warrior Run Presbyterian Church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. This church is also one of 445 American Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Sites registered between 1973 and 2003 by the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS), headquartered in Philadelphia. Approved sites received a metal plaque featuring John Calvin’s seal and the site’s registry number (PHS marker location unknown).

The following text is taken from the Presbyterian Historical Society website:

n 1849, the Warrior Run Church was one of the largest in the Presbytery of Northumberland. A century later it became the first active church maintained by the Commonwealth when the building was turned over to the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The first building was constructed in 1775. In 1789, a second building was erected on the present three-acre site, about three miles from the first site. The present red brick building was constructed in 1835. The last regular service
Warrior Run Church image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 22, 2015
3. Warrior Run Church
was held in 1953, and the congregation was formally dissolved in 1964. There are 73 Revolutionary War soldiers in the burial ground. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places and the Pennsylvania Register of Historic Sites.

 
Also see . . .  History of Warrior Run Church -. (Submitted on August 24, 2015, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionNative Americans
 
Warrior Run Church image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 22, 2015
4. Warrior Run Church
Warrior Run Church Interior image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 22, 2015
5. Warrior Run Church Interior
Church History - Click on photo to enlarge. image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 22, 2015
6. Church History - Click on photo to enlarge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2015, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 210 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on August 26, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 23, 2015, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.
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