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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sioux Falls in Minnehaha County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Washington High School

 
 
Washington High School Marker (<i>side one</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
1. Washington High School Marker (side one)
Inscription.
(side one)
For most of the 119 years between 1873 and 1992, a majority of Sioux Falls children attended one of three successive public schools erected on this site. The first, an unnamed small wood-frame elementary school, was replaced five years later by Central School, a large two story brick structure. In 1879 when 20 pupils enrolled to attend high school there, they became the first students of Sioux Falls High School.

A new high school building was opened in 1908. Named Washington High School (WHS), it

(side two)
was located north of Central School. In 1922 a second WHS unit opened south of Central. After “Old Central” was razed in 1934, a center unit was built to combine the three WHS units. The building was completed as it now stands in 1935.

In 1986 this huge neoclassical structure, built of locally quarried Sioux quartzite, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The original WHS closed in 1992 when a new WHS opened. After extensive renovation, the building reopened June 1, 1999, as the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science.

Dedicated in 2006 by the Minnehaha County Historical
Society and the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science

 
Erected 2006 by The
Washington High School Marker <br>(<i>side two</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
2. Washington High School Marker
(side two)
Minnehaha County Historical Society and the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science.
 
Location. 43° 32.612′ N, 96° 43.712′ W. Marker is in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in Minnehaha County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Avenue and West 12th Street, on the right when traveling south on South Main Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the sidewalk, near the south entrance to the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science (formerly Washington High School) building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 South Main Avenue, Sioux Falls SD 57104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The First School House 1873 (a few steps from this marker); Lt. Jonas Lien (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Government Building (about 500 feet away); Cigar Manufacturing (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Dakota, D.T. (approx. 0.4 miles away); Illinois Central Depot (approx. 0.4 miles away); Orpheum Theater (approx. half a mile away); Early Sioux Falls (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sioux Falls.
 
Regarding Washington High School. National Register of Historic Places (1986)
 
Also see . . .
1. History of Washington High School.
Washington High School Marker (<i>tall view; Washington Pavilion in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
3. Washington High School Marker (tall view; Washington Pavilion in background)
(This link presents historic photos of Washington High School.)
All Sioux Falls public high school students attended Washington High from 1908 through the 1963–1964 school year. Washington's enrollment grew to 3,500 during the 1965 year. During this time it was one of the largest high schools in the country. The building's recommended capacity was 2,100. To solve overcrowding, the district began construction on Lincoln High School, as a second high school. Following some delays, Lincoln High School opened on October 19, 1965, with 1,300 students. In 1992, the last year at old WHS, 1,439 students attended classes in the downtown Washington High School. (Submitted on October 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science. The Pavilion was a result of a renovation of Washington High School which was eventually moved to the northeast side of the city. The building is of Neoclassical styling and is architecturally interesting. The building's facade is created from large blocks of Sioux Quartzite, a pinkish quartzite native to the area and seen at the falls of the Big Sioux River. A small portion of the north wing is constructed of black rock which was believed to be black quartzite but is in fact corson diabase, which is hardened liquid magma.
Washington High School Marker (<i>wide view; Washington Pavilion in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
4. Washington High School Marker (wide view; Washington Pavilion in background)
(Submitted on October 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureEducationMan-Made Features
 
Washington High School East Entrance (<i>north of marker on Main Avenue</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
5. Washington High School East Entrance (north of marker on Main Avenue)
Washington High School (<i>dedication / cornerstone; near northeast corner of building</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
6. Washington High School (dedication / cornerstone; near northeast corner of building)
The thing of most value and joy that takes place here is the flow of human interest. It is the spirit of the institution to be human in all of its activities. May the days spent here be filled to overflowing with scholastic attainment, courteous conduct, joy and happiness, so that as the rest of the journey progresses, each life shall abound with gladness and our High School days shall ever remain a happy memory.
Placed by Old Central pupils - June 16, 1935
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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