Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Francisco Cervantes de Salazar

 
 
Francisco Cervantes de Salazar Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 11, 2018
1. Francisco Cervantes de Salazar Marker
Inscription.  

En este lugar estuvo la casa del primer cronista de la Ciudad de México, Francisco Cervantes de Salazar. 1554.
Ciudad de México

English translation:
In this place was the house of the first historian of Mexico City, Francisco Cervantes de Salazar. 1554.
Mexico City
 
Erected by Ciudad de México.
 
Location. 19° 25.992′ N, 99° 7.637′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México. Marker is on Emiliano Zapata just west of De la Santísima, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Emiliano Zapata is pedestrian-only on this block. Marker is in this post office area: Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México 06000, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Temple of the Holy Trinity (within shouting distance of this marker); Hospital Amor de Dios (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); House of Íñigo Noriega (about 180 meters away); José María de Agreda y Sánchez
Francisco Cervantes de Salazar Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 11, 2018
2. Francisco Cervantes de Salazar Marker
The marker is on the left side of the building, to the left of the nearest red awning.
(about 180 meters away); Real Seminario de Minería (about 180 meters away); Miguel Cabrera (about 180 meters away); Nidjei Israel Synagogue (approx. 0.2 kilometers away); Temple of Santa Teresa La Nueva (approx. 0.2 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Regarding Francisco Cervantes de Salazar. The most famous book by Francisco Cervantes de Salazar is Crónica de la Nueva España (Chronicle of New Spain), which was begun around 1554. Interestingly, many of the conquistadors that still inhabited Mexico City helped raise funds for his writing as they hoped to get more credit for conquering Mexico than they had received in earlier works by other authors. (See Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 13: Guide to Ethnohistorical Sources, Part Two, Howard F. Cline, John B. Glass, 1974)
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 28, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 28, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 30 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 28, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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