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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Men who died whilst imprisoned in this City

Trinity Church Cemetery

 
 
Imprisoned Patriots Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 1, 2008
1. Imprisoned Patriots Marker
Inscription.  
Sacred to the memory of
those brave and good Men who died
whilst imprisoned in this City, for their devotion to the
cause of American Independence.

At a meeting of Citizens held in the City Hall of the City of New York June 8, 1852, It was resolved that the erection of a becoming Monument with appropriate inscriptions by Trinity Church to the memory of the great and good men who died whilst in captivity in the old Sugar House and were interred in Trinity Church Yard in the City will be an act gratifying not only to the attendants of this meeting, but to every American Citizen.
A. C. Kingsland   Exec
    Charles W. Sandforf   V. Pres
    R. T. Compton
    Jon Trottier   Secretaries

At a meeting of the Church Wardens at Trinity Church held on November 6, 1852 it was decided to install a Monument by the Corporation in memory of the officers and soldiers of the Revolution held in British captivity in the City of New York many of whom were buried in the North part of Trinity Church Yard opposite Pine Street.
William Therian

 
Location.
Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 3, 2009
2. Side of Monument
40° 42.497′ N, 74° 0.688′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is on Broadway just north of Wall Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10006, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Firemen’s Memorial Monument (here, next to this marker); Fountain (a few steps from this marker); Charlotte Temple (a few steps from this marker); The American Institute of Architects (within shouting distance of this marker); Richard Churcher (within shouting distance of this marker); Trinity Church (within shouting distance of this marker); William Bradford (within shouting distance of this marker); Astor Cross (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. A Sugar House prison window exists near One Police Plaza.
 
Also see . . .  Trinity Church Cemetery - 1697 to present. (Submitted on November 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Prisoners of War, P.O.W.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 3, 2009
3. Side of Monument
Memorial to patriots who died as prisoners - Trinity Church cemetery. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 1, 2008
4. Memorial to patriots who died as prisoners - Trinity Church cemetery.
South view of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 3, 2009
5. South view of Monument
Trinity Church image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 3, 2009
6. Trinity Church
Marker is located in the north churchyard of Trinity Church in lower Manhattan.
Soldiers' Monument marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, December 1, 2018
7. Soldiers' Monument marker
One of a recent series of markers on gravesites of interest.
 

More. Search the internet for Men who died whilst imprisoned in this City.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 719 times since then and 26 times this year. Last updated on December 18, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1. submitted on November 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on November 14, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on November 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on November 14, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on December 2, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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