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Trenton in Edgefield County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Horn's Creek Church

Early Edgefield County History

 
 
Horn's Creek Church Marker - Religion image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
1. Horn's Creek Church Marker - Religion
Inscription.
Religion
Founded in 1768 as a result of a religious revival sweeping the American colonies known as the "Great Awakening," Horn's Creek Baptist church was one of the first churches established in the South Carolina backcountry. The church quickly became the religious and social center of a large area and was the focal point of much activity during the Colonial and Revolutionary years.

The Regulators
During the same time as the founding of Horn's Creek Church, law-abiding citizens were engaged in an effort to bring law and order to the frontier. Crime had become a major problem in the backcountry following the Cherokee War of 1760-1761, but there were no courts or law enforcement officials to bring the criminals to justice. in desperation, law-abiding citizens from across the backcountry of North and South Carolina formed a vigilante organization and called themselves "The Regulators." Chief among the Regulators in this area was Lawrence Rambo, an early settler and one of the founding members of Horn's Creek Church.

The American Revolution
Throughout the duration of the war, from 1775 to 1783, almost all people in this area were involved -- on one side or the other -- in the struggle for Independence. the Horn's Creek area was the center of much activity between Whigs and
Horn's Creek Church Marker - The Regulators image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
2. Horn's Creek Church Marker - The Regulators
Tories. In 1781 a skirmish took place near here on horn's Creek. the blockhouse at "Rambo Station," which had become the headquarters for the Patriots, was burned by Tories in that same year.
 
Erected by South Carolina Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina Heritage Corridor marker series.
 
Location. 33° 43.267′ N, 81° 56.183′ W. Marker is in Trenton, South Carolina, in Edgefield County. Marker is on Old Stage Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is to the right of the church's front entrance. The church is located just south of the intersection of Old State and Yarborough Roads (both dirt roads). Marker is in this post office area: Trenton SC 29847, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Horns Creek Baptist Church / Revolutionary Skirmish at Horns Creek (within shouting distance of this marker); Darby (approx. 3.8 miles away); Benjamin Ryan Tillman (approx. 4.2 miles away); John Gary Evans (approx. 4.2 miles away); John Calhoun Sheppard (approx. 4.2 miles away); James Strom Thurmond
Horn's Creek Church Marker - The American Revolution image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
3. Horn's Creek Church Marker - The American Revolution
(approx. 4.3 miles away); Milledge Luke Bonham (approx. 4.3 miles away); Richard Tutt House / Tutt Cemetery (approx. 4.3 miles away); Francis Wilkinson Pickens (approx. 4.4 miles away); James Henry Hammond (approx. 4.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Trenton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Horns Creek Baptist Church. One of the oldest Baptist churches in the South Carolina Upcountry, Horn Creek was incorporated in 1790. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. "Bloody pentagram found inside Horn Creek Baptist Church", Edgefield Daily, March 25, 2008. Historic Horn Creek Baptist Church continues to be a place widely regarded as haunted and that draws many thrill seekers, mainly teens, and some self-proclaimed ghost hunters to the 218 year-old rural church. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. "Historic Church suffers from vandalism", Edgefield Daily, November 17, 2006. Horn's Creek Baptist Church, incorporated in 1790 and placed on the National Historic Register in 1971, has seen the restoration done in 1988 completely washed away
Horn's Creek Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
4. Horn's Creek Church Marker
due to vandalism. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. "A Horn's Creek Church Ghost in the mirror?", Edgefield Daily, Mach 19, 2008. EdgefieldDaily.com received a picture sent in by some area young adults that they claim shows a ghost when the picture was taken at the Horn Creek Baptist Church. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Graniteville Paranoramal Society Horns Creek Investigation. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Horn Creek Baptist Church
Horn Creek Baptist Church, incorporated in 1790, a simple one-roomed country church, has no electricity and remains essentially unchanged. Supported by fieldstone foundation piers, the church has wooden steps; two front door hinged to fold in center; wide board floors and louver shutters. Door behind pulpit leads to creek for baptizing. Adjoining cemetery has excellent iron work including cast iron gate at Bettis plot with design of Palmetto tree flanked by lambs and roses. Wooden picket fence next to Bettis plot surrounds fieldstone markers. Church is open on occasion for special services.

Significance
One of oldest Baptist
Horn's Creek Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
5. Horn's Creek Church and Marker
churches in South Carolina up country, Horn Creek was incorporated in 1790. One of few remaining meeting house style churches reflecting austere simplicity and manifesting frugality of early settlers. Revolutionary activity in the Horn Creek area included 1781 skirmish in which Patriots, Captain Thomas Kee of Colonel Leroy Hammondís regiment, attached Tory party under Captain Clark. Clark was killed, and entire company made prisoners. Church burial ground has 18th century graves in fair condition. Plot fencing very from ornate iron work to old wooden pickets. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted August 6, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Early Back-Country Churches: Horns Creek Church
Horns Creek Church, located about five miles south of the town of Edgefield and said to have been constituted about 1768, was probably a branch of Stephens Creek Church, though the history of its early years is lost. Rev. Messrs. Daniel Marshall, Saunders Walker, and Benjamin Harry covered this region with their missionary labors. Horns Creek Church appears as a member of the Georgia Association in 1788 with Hezekiah Walker as minister. In 1790 criticism of Mr. Walker came before the Bethel Association, which was about to proceed against him when a report
Horn's Creek Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
6. Horn's Creek Church and Marker
was made in 1791 that Horns Creek Church had already acted in such a way as to produce "satisfaction respecting the charges..."

"Hezekiah Walker, John Frasier, and Samuel Walker with several other members...did their petition" ask and obtain incorporation by act of January 20, 1790, naming "The Baptist Church on Horns Creek in Edgefield County, in the State of South Carolina." John Bolger, a candidate for the ministry in 1792, soon left them.

Horns Creek asked dismissal from Georgia Association in 1801 to enter the Bethel Association in the next years. The important men in the congregation in 1802 were Samuel March and John Landrum, both of whom were ministers in 1803. This was a large and active church.

A second Horns Creek Church appears to have existed in 1790, which may have been a branch of Horns Creek. though more probably of Stephens Creek. Nothing is known of its location or history beyond the fact that Benjamin Harry was minister and the membership varied from twenty to twenty-five between 1790 and 1794. (Source: South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805 by Leah Townsend (1974), pgs 161-162.)
    — Submitted January 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraNotable PersonsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Horn's Creek Church and Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
7. Horn's Creek Church and Cemetery
Stylized Palmetto Trees Used in Iron Frnce around Burial Plots image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
8. Stylized Palmetto Trees Used in Iron Frnce around Burial Plots
Horns Creek Baptist Church - Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
9. Horns Creek Baptist Church - Interior
Horns Creek Baptist Church - Detail of Ceiling Art image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
10. Horns Creek Baptist Church - Detail of Ceiling Art
Detail of Angel Decorations image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
11. Detail of Angel Decorations
One is located in each of the four corners of the ceiling.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,439 times since then and 90 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on August 6, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on October 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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