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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hilton Head Island in Beaufort County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Forts of the Civil War Era

 
 
Forts of the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, June 12, 2017
1. Forts of the Civil War Marker
Inscription.  Fort Howell is typical of the earthen forts constructed during the Civil War by both Confederates and Union Armies. The change from earlier brick and stone masonry forts was the result of advances in weaponry that occurred as the Civil War approached. Rifled cannons came into use, and with their increased range, power, and accuracy over previous smoothbore cannons, they could easily breach the older style masonry fort walls, as seen in the photograph of Fort Pulaski below. The dirt walls of the Civil War earthen forts could better absorb incoming rifled artillery shells and protect the men and weapons inside the fort.

The preservation of Fort Howell is largely due to the Greenwood Development Corporation, which owned the property containing the fort. When archaeologists revealed the significance of the property, Greenwood deeded Fort Howell to the Hilton Head Island Land Trust in order to protect it in perpetuity. It had been all but forgotten in the history of the island, but its significance has been appreciated with recognition it has received since that time.
 
Erected by Hilton Head Island

Marker Detail: Fort Pulaski image. Click for full size.
By courtesy Fort Pulaski web site images, June 12, 2017
2. Marker Detail: Fort Pulaski
Land Trust.
 
Location. 32° 13.964′ N, 80° 41.64′ W. Marker is in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker can be reached from Beach City Road 0.1 miles south of Dillon Rd.. Marker located inside Fort Howell Historic Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 160 Beach City Road, Hilton Head Island SC 29926, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Howell / Captain Suter (here, next to this marker); The Troops that Built Fort Howell / Camp Baird (here, next to this marker); The Story of Fort Howell (a few steps from this marker); Fort Howell - 1864 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Howell (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mitchelville Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. James Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Cherry Hill School (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hilton Head Island.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Howell. Hilton Head Island Land Trust (Submitted on April 9, 2019.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Forts of the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, June 12, 2017
3. Forts of the Civil War Marker
Forts of the Civil War marker is attached to this covered pavilion located within Fort Howell Historic Park.
Fort Howell Historic Park Entrance Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, June 12, 2017
4. Fort Howell Historic Park Entrance Sign
Fort Howell – 1864 image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross
5. Fort Howell – 1864
An excellent example of the defensive earthworks common to the Civil War era. Fort Howell was constructed by Union forces occupying Hilton Head Island and was one of the final major fortifications to be built during the war. The men of the 32nd U.S. Colored Infantry Volunteers labored to complete the fort in the fall of 1864. Its purpose: to protect Mitchelville, a freedmen’s town of newly emancipated slaves, which lay just down the road from this spot. Fort Howell was deeded to the Hilton Head Island Land Trust in 1993 to insure its public preservation as an historic site for current and future generations to enjoy.
North Bastion image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross
6. North Bastion
Built to protect the long walls of the fort, twin bastions projected from the main earthworks and offered secure vantage points from which troops could provide covering fire.
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on April 9, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 7, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 95 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 7, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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