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Blakeley in Baldwin County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battle of Fort Blakeley

 
 
Battle of Fort Blakeley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 6, 2019
1. Battle of Fort Blakeley Marker
Inscription.  You are standing on the site of the last grand charge of the Civil War, made during the Battle of Fort Blakeley on April 9. 1865. The battle was the climax of a months-long campaign that led ultimately to the capture of the city of Mobile by Union forces.

Probably the last charge of this war, it was as gallant as any on record" Harper's Weekly, May 27, 1865

Federal troops began to lay siege to Fort Blakeley over a week prior to the battle. For several days, the opposing armies engaged in heavy skirmishing as the besiegers steadily advanced series of earthworks closer to the Confederate line. By Sunday, April 9, the armies lay less than 1,000 yards apart.

At approximately 5:30 p.m., the Union army launched a general assault all along a nearly three-mile long front. Some 16,000 troops emerged from a line
The Battle of Fort Blakeley Marker with Redoubt #4 in background. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 6, 2019
2. The Battle of Fort Blakeley Marker with Redoubt #4 in background.
of trenches a few hundred yards to your left and charged with a yell. They began taking casualties almost immediately, coming under rifle and artillery fire as well as occasionally tripping scattered land mines which had earlier been placed in the field over which they charged. The surging column quickly drove in skirmishers posted in the rifle pits in front of you. Pausing briefly while under a deadly fire, they cut their way through a series of obstacles made from fallen trees and swarmed the approximately 3,500 Confederate defenders.

Fierce, close quarters combat briefly raged. Multiple Union troops were shot down while attempting to plant their flags on the earthworks, and in places the combatants waged desperate hand to hand fighting. In some places the fort's defenders surrendered quickly after being overwhelmed while in others they fought to the bitter end even after being surrounded. The entire affair was over within about thirty minutes. The great majority of the garrison was captured, although a very small number of Rebels managed to escape. Exact casualties figures
Map of the the Battle of Fort Blakeley image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of American Battlefield Trust, 2019
3. Map of the the Battle of Fort Blakeley
are unknown; about 75 Confederates were killed during the assault while the attackers suffered about 150 killed and around 650 wounded during the entirety of operations.

The scene was picturesque and grand. From different points of view the assaulting lines could be seen for a mile or two.. The regimental colors, though not in perfect line, were steadily advancing, and the troops were dashing on over and through the obstructions like a stormy wave." Brig. Gen. Christopher Columbus Andrews

Photo caption: Harper's Weekly carried this depiction of the Battle of Fort Blakeley on May 27, 1865
 
Erected 2017 by Historic Blakeley State Park, Auburn University College of Liberal Arts, the University of Alabama Center for Economic Development, and the Delaware Valley Civil War Roundtable.
 
Location. 30° 44.967′ N, 87° 54.664′ W. Marker is in Blakeley, Alabama, in Baldwin County. Marker is on Battlefield Road 0.3 miles east of Green
April 2019 reenactment with Confederate soldiers in rifle pits. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 6, 2019
4. April 2019 reenactment with Confederate soldiers in rifle pits.
One of the seven lines of defense for Redoubt #4.
Street. Touch for map. Located in Historic Blakeley Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: Battlefield Road, Spanish Fort AL 36527, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Blakeley (Fort Blakely*) (here, next to this marker); The United States Colored Troops (USCT) at the Battle of Fort Blakeley (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Siege of Fort Blakeley (about 600 feet away); The Battle of Fort Blakely (approx. 0.3 miles away); Alabama (approx. half a mile away); Battle of Blakeley (approx. half a mile away); Redoubt Six (approx. half a mile away); The Bottle Creek Site (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Blakeley.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Fort Blakeley - The War Ends and the Battle Begins. (Submitted on April 8, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
View from Union attack towards Redoubt #4 image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 20, 2019
5. View from Union attack towards Redoubt #4
There were 7 lines of defense here. A few are shown in this photo, the spike poles, the stumps with telegraph wire strung between them and a moat in front of the redoubt. The final Union assault took place across this ground. The restored fortifications in background were part of the defenses of Redoubt #4, where the major Federal breakthrough was achieved on April 9, 1865.
A view of the rear of Redoubt #4 showing position of Abbay's Mississippi battery. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 20, 2019
6. A view of the rear of Redoubt #4 showing position of Abbay's Mississippi battery.
View at rear of Redoubt #4 showing position of 1st & 3rd Missouri Cavalry Battalion. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 20, 2019
7. View at rear of Redoubt #4 showing position of 1st & 3rd Missouri Cavalry Battalion.
 
More. Search the internet for The Battle of Fort Blakeley.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 8, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 56 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 8, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   5, 6, 7. submitted on April 20, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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