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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Dover in Kent County, England, United Kingdom
 

Blériot’s 1909 Landing Site

 
 
Blériot's 1909 Landing Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 21, 2007
1. Blériot's 1909 Landing Site Marker
Inscription. After making the first Channel flight by aeroplane Louis Blériot landed at this spot on Sunday 25th July 1909.
 
Erected by Alexander Duckham for the Aero Club of the United Kingdom.
 
Location. 51° 7.868′ N, 1° 19.558′ E. Marker is near Dover, England, in Kent County. Marker can be reached from Upper Road near Dover Castle. Touch for map. Marker is in a wooded area less than 0.1 mile northeast of Dover Castle and is accessible via a path through the woods from Upper Road. Marker is in this post office area: Dover, England CT16 1HP, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 11 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Britain Memorial (approx. 9.1 kilometers away); Caesar’s Invasion of Britain (approx. 10.4 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .  A video of an original Blériot XI in flight. Just 5½ years after the historic first flight of the Wright brothers, French inventor Louis Blériot flew his monoplane from near Calais, France, across the English Channel to Dover, England. The 22-mile crossing took 37 minutes. An original Blériot XI is maintained in flying condition at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in Rhinebeck, New York.
Blériot's Landing Site image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 21, 2007
2. Blériot's Landing Site
Louis Blériot's monoplane is outlined in stone on a southwest-facing slope near Dover, Kent. The marker's inscription appears where the wing meets the fuselage.
(Submitted on October 29, 2009, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Bleriot Memorial
The monument was marked out originally by my grandfather, Frederick William Duckham. The aircraft had left discoloured grass in its present shape, and my mother told me he filled it in with concrete.
Alexander Duckham was his brother. He sponsored Bleriot and I have a photo of them in a cockpit of a biplane together. At one time they jointly held the altitude record of 800 feet.

Editor's Note: Thank you for sharing some of your family's history behind this historical marker. Please consider uploading a copy of the photograph you mentioned, using the "Add Photo" link above.
    — Submitted August 10, 2011, by Digby Martin Fletcher of Purley, Surrey.

 
Additional keywords. aircraft aviation
 
Categories. Air & SpaceNotable Events
 
Blériot’s 1909 Landing Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 8, 2018
3. Blériot’s 1909 Landing Site Marker
The granite memorial is the exact size of Blériot’s Aeroplane
Propeller from Louis Blériot's Wrecked Aeroplane image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 6, 2018
4. Propeller from Louis Blériot's Wrecked Aeroplane
In the Royal Air Force Museum at Hendon Aerodrome in Colindale, near London
Propeller from Louis Blériot's Wrecked Aeroplane image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 6, 2018
5. Propeller from Louis Blériot's Wrecked Aeroplane
This propeller blade was taken by me
with Monsieur Louis Bleriot ‘s permission
from the wrecked monoplane as it
lay in Northfall Meadow on the
morning of July 25th 1909
(signature illegible)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 22, 2009, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,869 times since then and 55 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week November 29, 2009. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 22, 2009, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.   3, 4, 5. submitted on September 8, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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