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Alamance in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Alamance

 
 
Battle of Alamance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 31, 2010
1. Battle of Alamance Marker
Inscription. The militia under Royal Governor Tryon defeated the Regulators at this point, May 16, 1771.
 
Erected 1939 by State Historical Commission. (Marker Number G 24.)
 
Location. 36° 0.517′ N, 79° 31.25′ W. Marker is in Alamance, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is on NC Highway 62 South, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at Alamance Battleground, a State of North Carolina Historic Site. Directions from I-85/40. Exit 143. Travel South on NC Highway 62 for 5.8 miles. Entrance to Battleground is on the right. Marker is immediately beyond entrance, on your left. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5803 NC Highway 62 South, Alamance NC 27201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Battle of the Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Alamance (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Battle of the Alamance (about 300 feet away); The Regulators' Field (about 300 feet away); The John Allen House (about 600 feet away); Battle of Clapp's Mill
Battle of Alamance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
2. Battle of Alamance Marker
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Oak Grove Plantation (approx. 1.8 miles away); a different marker also named Oak Grove Plantation (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alamance.
 
More about this marker. The marker sits on the battlefield. Nearby are two monuments. The closest is a granite monument, erected in 1880. The second monument is topped by a statue of James Hunter, General of the Regulators. Across the highway is the visitor's center which includes artifacts and an audiovisual presentation of the battle. The John Allen House is a restored log house, complete with furnishings. Allen, a local resident, constructed the house around 1780. It is a typical frontier dwelling of the period. The Battleground is open Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
 
Regarding Battle of Alamance. The years preceding the American Revolution, were a period of discontent. Citizens confronted the Governor's officials over various grievances, including excessive taxes and dishonest officials.

Peaceful protests and minor incidents occurred until 1768, when an association of "Regulators" was formed. The group included James Hunter, Rednap
Battle of Alamance Marker and Nearby Monuments image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
3. Battle of Alamance Marker and Nearby Monuments
Howell, William Butler and Herman Husband. These men and others began to take a radical approach. They disrupted court proceedings, refused to pay fees and terrorized local officials.

In March 1771, Royal Governor William Tryon mustered a militia to bring order to the area. General Hugh Waddell was ordered to approach Hillsoborough, NC by way of Salisbury. Waddell was to meet Tryon's army at Hillsborough. Waddell encountered a large group of Regulators en route and turned back. Governor Tryon left Hillsborough on May 11, to go to Waddell's location as reinforcements. Tryon's men, approximately 1,000 of them, rested on the Banks of Alamance Creek. Five miles away, approximately 2,000 Regulators had gathered.

On May 16, 1771, the Regulators were asked by Governor Tryon's men to disperse. They refused and the battle ensued. The Regulators were no match for Tryon's men. They were untrained and unorganized. Many fled the battlefield, leaving neighbors to fight on. Nine members of Governor Tryon's militia were killed, and 61 were wounded. Regulator losses are unknown, but estimated to be much greater. Governor Tryon took approximately 15 prisoners. Seven of them were later executed. Many Regulators moved to frontier areas beyond North Carolina. Those who stayed pledged an oath of allegiance to the royal government, in exchange for a pardon.
 
Also see . . .
Granite Monument Erected in 1880 image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
4. Granite Monument Erected in 1880
Monument Reads: First Battle of the Revolution Here was Fought the Battle of Alamance. May, 16, 1771. Between the British and the Regulators.
 Alamance Battleground website. (Submitted on March 10, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. American Revolution, Burlington, Graham, John Allen House, Revolutionary War, Governor Tryon, Hillsborough, Herman Husband, Waddell, General James Hunter
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable EventsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Monument to James Hunter, General of the Regulators image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
5. Monument to James Hunter, General of the Regulators
Detail of the Monument Honoring General James Hunter image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
6. Detail of the Monument Honoring General James Hunter
Battleground Map with Troop Positions image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
7. Battleground Map with Troop Positions
Located Outside at the Visitor's Center
The John Allen House image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
8. The John Allen House
Restored with many original furnishings. Open to the Public.
Working Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 6, 2010
9. Working Cannon
Fired during Re-enactments (the second weekend in May) and during Colonial Living Week in October. Cannon demonstrations are also available for groups who make request prior to visit.
Battle of Alamance - Map of Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2010
10. Battle of Alamance - Map of Battlefield
This marker is near the road, on NC Highway 62. On your left. just past the highway marker, as you travel south. The granite 1880 monument can be seen in the distance.
Battle of Alamance Marker - Battlefield Map image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2010
11. Battle of Alamance Marker - Battlefield Map
A Closer View of the Text to the Left of the Battlefield Map.
Battle of Alamance Marker - Battlefield Map image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2010
12. Battle of Alamance Marker - Battlefield Map
A Closer View of the Center Panel
Battle of Alamance Marker - Battlefield Map image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2010
13. Battle of Alamance Marker - Battlefield Map
A Closer View of the Text to the Right of the Battlefield Map
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 6, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 4,467 times since then and 128 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 22, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on March 6, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.   10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on May 8, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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