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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
West Point in Troup County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Tyler

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Fort Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
1. Fort Tyler Marker
Inscription. 125 yards northwest, at crest of hill, stood Fort Tyler - last Confederate fort to fall in War Between the States. Fort Tyler was of earthwork construction 35 yds. square surrounded by ditch 12 feet wide, 10 feet deep and enclosed by wooden abatis. The fort was erected to protect important railroad and wagon bridges across Chattahoochee river east of this point.

On Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, the garrison of 265 Confederates - remnants of Point Coupe Louisiana and Waittes’ South Carolina Batteries - aided by boys and convalescent Confederate soldiers - withstood the attack of 3,500 Federals before capitulating late in afternoon. The [CS] forces were commanded by Gen. R.C. Tyler, Col. J.H. Fannin, Capts. Gonzales, Trepanier and Webb; Lieuts. Montgomery and McFarland. Units of 2nd and 4th Indiana, 7th Kentucky, and 1st Wisconsin, commanded by Col. O.H. LaGrange, formed part of [US] forces.

Stone home of Dr. A.W. Griggs, Confederate surgeon, built in 1858 (remodeled 1951) stands 40 ft. nw. Although hit repeatedly by cannon fire of both forces, original walls are intact. Here Mrs. Griggs and other West Point women gave aid and shelter to wounded of both armies after battle.
 
Erected 1953 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 141-2.)
 
Marker series.
Fort Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
2. Fort Tyler Marker
This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 52.806′ N, 85° 11.166′ W. Marker is in West Point, Georgia, in Troup County. Marker is at the intersection of West 10th Street and 6th Avenue, on the right when traveling west on West 10th Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: West Point GA 31833, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Tyler (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); More Enduring Than Marble (about 500 feet away); Battle of West Point (approx. 0.3 miles away); "Daughters of the Confederacy" (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gen. Robert C. Tyler, C.S.A. (approx. ¾ mile away); Fort Tyler Cemetery (approx. ¾ mile away); Bluffton-Lanett, Alabama (approx. 0.9 miles away in Alabama); Tenth Street School (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Point.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Tyler and West Point. A website with complete information on Fort Tyler and the Battle of West Point. (Submitted on October 19, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Fort Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
3. Fort Tyler Marker
Looking east on West 10th Street toward the Chattachochee River
Fort Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
4. Fort Tyler Marker
Looking west across Sixth Avenue toward the Griggs house
Fort Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
5. Fort Tyler Marker
Looking north on Sixth Avenue; Fort Tyler is at the crest of the hill at the left.
The Entrance to Fort Tyler image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
6. The Entrance to Fort Tyler
Fort Tyler image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
7. Fort Tyler
The site of the reconstructed Fort Tyler is at the top of the hill in the center of the photo. The walking trail leads to the fort.
The Dr. A. W. Griggs House image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 18, 2010
8. The Dr. A. W. Griggs House
Built in 1858, the house was shelled by both sides during the battle, and then used as a hospital following the surrender of Fort Tyler.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 19, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 971 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 19, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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