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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Watervliet in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Meneely Foundry

 
 
Meneely Foundry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 23, 2008
1. Meneely Foundry Marker
Inscription.
Meneely Foundry
1826 - 1950 First Chime &
Carillon in U.S. Cast Here
Foremost Bell Maker
Patented Rotary Yoke And
Casting Procedures.

 
Erected by Watervliet Historical Society.
 
Location. 42° 43.591′ N, 73° 42.011′ W. Marker is in Watervliet, New York, in Albany County. Marker is on Broadway, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is beside the CDTA bus stop, just north of the Watervliet Public Library. Marker is in this post office area: Watervliet NY 12189, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civil War Parrott Rifle ( within shouting distance of this marker); City of Watervliet ( within shouting distance of this marker); Saint Patrick's Church Bell ( within shouting distance of this marker); The Nalle Rescue ( about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); U.S. Army 3 Inch M5 Antitank Gun ( about 600 feet away); Peter J. Dalessandro
Meneely Foundry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 22, 2008
2. Meneely Foundry Marker
The pedestrians are walking beside Broadway in Watervliet. The yellow school buses in the background are northbound on Interstate 787.
( about 600 feet away); Uncle Sam ( approx. 0.3 miles away); Mayor James F. Cavanaugh ( approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Watervliet.
 
Regarding Meneely Foundry. After the prosperity brought on by the Erie Canal changed West Troy ( now Watervliet) from a rural area into a bustling community with in two decades of its 1825 opening, Andrew Meneely, a native of Scotland, had come to the United States in early 1800's and immediately got a job in the Julius Hanks foundry in Troy. He married Hanks' cousin and convinced Hanks to build a bell foundry in West Troy which in now Watervliet. The plant opened in 1829 and within a decade the West Troy foundry was shipping carillons and bells throughout the country, and even overseas. By the end of the Civil War, the Meneely Bell Co. had earned world renown for its bells. In the course of the Meneely Bellís 144 year history, its foundry manufactured over 70,000 bells.

After the death of Andrew Meneely in 1851, his sons Edward and George took over the operations and they continued to
Meneely Foundry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 3, 2008
3. Meneely Foundry Marker
The marker is between the colorful maple tree and the bus stop shelter.
manufacture bells at a dizzy pace. By the early 1900's Meneely Bells rang in Scotland, France, England, Germany, Australia, India and South America. World War II proved fateful to the Meneely Bell Co., as copper and tin became unusable for non-war operations. Before Meneely could reopen, the Korean War came along to continue a restriction on bell materials.

The foundry's demise became inevitable and in 1954 The Meneely Bell Foundry closed. In 1974 the Watervliet Historical Society tried to save the foundry building that had been idle for 20 years, but the city's urban renewal plans were already complete and the effort failed. In 1975 the building was torn down to make room for downtown development.

The Mayor J. Leo O'Brien Municipal Center which houses the Watervliet Library and the Senior Center is on the site of the former Meneely Bell Foundry.
 
Additional comments.
1. Andrew Meneely
Andrew Meneely was the son of Adrew James Meneely and Eleanor Cobb Meneely who immigrated from the North of Ireland in 1795. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
Meneely Foundry image. Click for full size.
Collection of Joe Connor
4. Meneely Foundry
This is from Meneely Foundry promotional litature.
    — Submitted December 3, 2010, by Vence Meneely of Shidler, Oklahoma.

 
Additional keywords. West Troy
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable Buildings
 
Meneely Foundry Bell image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 22, 2008
5. Meneely Foundry Bell
This Meneely bell is on display in the lobby of the Watervliet Public Library. It was cast in bronze in 1832 and originally hung in the Baptist Church, Eaton, NY. The Meneely Foundry was located a few hundred feet to the north of the Watervliet Public Library, facing Broadway. The bell was donated by the Covert Manufacturing Co. of Watervliet. The bell weighs 1300 pounds, has a medium Tone G. In 1832 it cost $390.00. In 1979 the equivalent bell would have cost $10,400.00. The frame and mounting of this bell was manufactured and donated by Fred Streck of Watervliet, NY.
Meneely Foundry Promotional Literature image. Click for full size.
Collection of Joe Connor
6. Meneely Foundry Promotional Literature
Meneely Foundry Bell image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 23, 2007
7. Meneely Foundry Bell
This bell is on display in Guilderland, NY.
Meneely Foundry Bell image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 17, 2008
8. Meneely Foundry Bell
This Meneely Bell is on display in the museum at the Springfield Arsenal in Springfield, MA. The bell was used to warn factory workers before the line shaft was turned on. The line shaft powered the belts and pulleys and machine shop equipment.
Andrew Meneely - Founder of Meneely Foundry image. Click for full size.
Collection of Joe Connor
9. Andrew Meneely - Founder of Meneely Foundry
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 27, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 2,529 times since then and 163 times this year. Last updated on February 16, 2011, by Carl Scott Zimmerman of Kirkwood, Missouri. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on June 27, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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