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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

In Honor of Leslie Coffelt

 
 
In Honor of Leslie Coffelt Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 20, 2018
1. In Honor of Leslie Coffelt Marker
New plaque observed, wording identical to older plaque.
Inscription.
White House policeman
who gave his life in defense of
the President of the United States
here at the Blair House, November 1, 1950

"For loyalty, bravery and heroism
beyond the call of duty."

Presented by National Sojourners
in commemoration of his sacrifice.
Dedicated May 21, 1952, by President Harry S Truman

 
Erected 1952 by National Sojourners.
 
Location. 38° 53.934′ N, 77° 2.315′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and Jackson Place, on the right when traveling west on Pennsylvania Avenue. Touch for map. Located in front of the Blair-Lee House. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1653 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Francis Preston Blair (here, next to this marker); The Blair House (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Blair House (here, next to this marker); The Entrance Gardens (here, next to this marker); The Lee House (a few steps from this marker);
In Honor of Leslie Coffelt Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
2. In Honor of Leslie Coffelt Marker
First Home of the Reserve Officers Association (a few steps from this marker); Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downtown.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Blair House. The Blair House is the official state guest house of the U.S. President. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Assassination Attempt on President Truman. On November 1, 1950, two Puerto Rican activists attempted to assassinate President Truman, who was staying at the Blair House during White House renovations. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Leslie Coffelt: White House police officer, killed in defense of President Truman on Nov. 1, 1950. WWII U.S. Army veteran: Private, Company "B" 300th Infantry Regiment - buried in Arlington National Cemetery. (Submitted on May 18, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

4. Leslie William "Les" Coffelt: White House policeman, U.S. Secret Service. ... biography of Coffelt and photo
Several Markers in front of the Blair-Lee House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
3. Several Markers in front of the Blair-Lee House
in his uniform as a White House policeman, U.S. Secret Service. (Submitted on May 20, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Law enforcement officer; killed in action; Freemason.
 
Categories. HeroesNotable Events
 
The Blair-Lee House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
4. The Blair-Lee House
Coffelt was manning a guard booth in front of the steps to the right at the time of the assassination attempt. Though mortally wounded, Coffelt would manage to return fire during the gunfight that ensued, and kill one of the attackers.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,171 times since then and 29 times this year. Last updated on May 21, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on January 20, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2, 3, 4. submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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