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Parkers Crossroads in Henderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Very Successful Campaign

 
 
A Very Successful Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 14, 2009
1. A Very Successful Campaign Marker
Inscription. "We have worked, rode, and fought hard"
On January 1, 1863 Forrest reached the Tennessee River. By 9 p.m. the entire command, more than 2,000 men and horses, six cannon, and a train of wagons, had crossed the river on the same flatboats that had brought them to the west bank fifteen days earlier. The Federals ill-managed pursuit, always a step behind, failed to stop them. On January 3 Forrest wrote Bragg, "We have worked, rode, and fought hard, and I hope accomplished to a considerable extent if not entirely the object of our campaign..."

Forrest's campaign to disable the railroads supplying Grant was a marked success. In spite of terrible rain, sleet, snow-storms, and numerous skirmishes, his brigade inflicted heavy damages on the Mobile & Ohio and the Nashville & Northwestern railroads. They destroyed railroad bridges, trestles, water tanks, depots, and culverts. Rails were torn up and twisted. Supplies that could not be removed were burned. Traffic between Union City and Jackson was not restored until early March 1863. More importantly, Forrest's West Tennessee raid demonstrated to Grant that it was foolish to depend on any long rail line to supply an army moving in the enemy's country. Forrest's success, coupled with Earl Van Dorn's successful raid on the supply depot at Holly Springs, was instrumental in Grant's
A Very Successful Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 14, 2009
2. A Very Successful Campaign Marker
To the left are other markers along the trail.
decision to delay plans to move on Vicksburg.

A Missed Opportunity
The cavalry raids of Nathan Bedford Forrest, in conjunction with those of Earl Van Dorn in Mississippi and John Hunt Morgan in Kentucky, caused so much damage that they had important and vital strategic implications for both the Union and Confederacy. For a brief time, the advantage won by the December 1862 raids gave the Confederacy the opportunity to launch an offensive in America's heartland. They failed to do so and, after months of delay, the Union regained the momentum temporarily lost.

Braxton Bragg, Forrest's commanding officer, wrote the War Department, "...the results of his expedition have been most brilliant and decisive. The enemy, in consequence of this vigorous assault... have been compelled to throw back a large force from the Mississippi and to virtually abandon a campaign which so threatened our safety."

Forrest's success earned him and his command an official commendation by the Confederate Congress.

The Final Tally
- Stockades burned at Carroll Station, Humboldt, Rutherford Station and Kenton Station
- Depot burned at Humboldt
- Over 100 miles of track destroyed
- Numerous bridges and trestles dstroyed
- Over 400 men recruited for the Confederate army
- Over 1,200 prisoners taken, including over 40 officers (all subsequently
A Very Successful Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 8, 2010
3. A Very Successful Campaign Marker
paroled)
- Over 1,500 total casualties inflicted on the enemy
- Hundreds of badly needed modern rifles captured
- 5 cannon captured (three subsequently recaptured)
- 11 caissons captured
- Hundreds of thousands of rounds of ammunition captured
- 38 supply wagons and ambulances captured
- Hundreds of horses and mules captured
- Commissary, quartermaster, and ordnance stores seized or burned, including rations, tents, artillery rounds, clothing, and accouterments
 
Erected by Parkers Crossroads Battlefield Association.
 
Location. 35° 47.281′ N, 88° 23.366′ W. Marker is in Parkers Crossroads, Tennessee, in Henderson County. Marker can be reached from Federal Lane, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located on the South Loop Walking Trail at stop seven, of the driving tour of Parker's Crossroads Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Wildersville TN 38388, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. McPeake Cabin (a few steps from this marker); The Lexington-Huntingdon Road (within shouting distance of this marker); Lt. Col. Alonzo Napier (within shouting distance of this marker); Withdrawal to the Split-Rail Fence (within shouting distance of this marker); Nathan Bedford Forrest (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Parker's Crossroads (within shouting distance of this marker); Battlefield Overview (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Three Desperate Charges (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parkers Crossroads.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a portrait of General Bragg. On the right is a photo of damage made to a railroad. Forrest's brigade covered over 100 miles in 15 days, leaving a path of destruction in its wake.
 
Also see . . .
1. Parkers Crossroads. Civil War Preservation Trust page detailing the battle and preservation efforts. (Submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Parkers Crossroads Battlefield Association. More details about the battle and preservation efforts. (Submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 919 times since then and 49 times this year. Last updated on March 24, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on August 22, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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