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Sanderson in Terrell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War

 
 
General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War Marker (<i>front side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2014
1. General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War Marker (front side)
Inscription.  
(front)
County Named for Texas Confederate
General
Alexander W. Terrell

1827 - 1912

Born Virginia. Came to Texas 1852. Dist. Judge 1857-63. Entered Confederate service 1863 as Lt. Col. Commanded Terrell’s Texas Cavalry assigned special duty to try to keep open vital supply sources of cotton— lifeblood of South. Led his unit in Red River Campaign 1864 to prevent Union invasion of Texas, being wounded, Battle Mansfield. Promoted Brigadier General 1865. Went to Mexico rather than surrender at war’s end. Soon returned to Texas. As State Legislator authored present primary election law. Minister to Turkey 1893-97. Outstanding lawyer and public servant.

(rear)
Texas
in the Civil War

1861—1865

Texas made an all-out effort for the Confederacy after a 3 to 1 popular vote for secession. 90,000 troops, famed for mobility and daring, fought on every battlefront. A 2000-mile frontier and coastline was successfully defended from Union troops and savage Indians. Wagon trains, laden with cotton—lifeblood of the South—crossed
General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War Marker (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2014
2. General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War Marker (back side)
the state to Mexico to trade for medical supplies, clothing, military goods. State and private industry produced wagons, pots, kettles, leather goods, ammunition, guns, salt, hospital supplies. At home old men, women, children, slaves provided grain, meats, cotton, cloth to the Army giving much keeping little.
A memorial to Texans
Who served the Confederacy

 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 2121.)
 
Location. 30° 8.562′ N, 102° 23.661′ W. Marker is in Sanderson, Texas, in Terrell County. Marker is at the intersection of East Hackberry Street and 2nd Street, on the left when traveling east on East Hackberry Street. Marker is located at the southeast corner of the Terrell County Courthouse property. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 105 East Hackberry Street, Sanderson TX 79848, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Terrell County Eagle (within shouting distance of this marker); El Buen Pastor Methodist Church (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sanderson Flash Flood (approx. 0.2 miles away); Terrell County (approx. ¾ mile away); Baxter's Curve Train Robbery (approx. 9.3 miles away); Dryden Intermediate Field Site 29 (approx. 12½ miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is polished pink granite stone and somewhat difficult to read
 
Also see . . .
General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2014
3. General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War Marker (wide view)

1. Alexander W. Terrell.
When he moved to Texas in 1852, Terrell set up a law practice in Austin. A relative newcomer, he ran for district court judge in 1857 and unseated the established holder of that office in a bitter contest. After Reconstruction, Terrell served in both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives. In spite of his public declarations declining his candidacy for re-election, he continued to be re-elected by record margins. In total, he served sixteen years in the state legislature. (Submitted on November 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Alexander Watkins Terrell.
During his years in the legislature, he authored several acts: a bill requiring jurors to be literate; the enabling legislation for the Railroad Commission; the Terrell Election Law (see ELECTION LAWS), which required candidates for public office to be nominated by direct primaries instead of by state or local conventions; and the measure which pledged the resources of three million acres in the Panhandle to the Chicago-based Capitol Syndicate to construct the Capitol. (Submitted on November 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Alexander W. Terrell.
He briefly chose to flee to Mexico after the war. After Reconstruction, he served in both the Texas Senate and House of Representatives,
Terrell County Courthouse (<i>near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 1, 2014
4. Terrell County Courthouse (near marker)
serving sixteen years in the state legislature. From 1893 until 1897, he was minister plenipotentiary to the Ottoman Empire during U.S. President Grover Cleveland's second administration. From 1909 to 1911, he was a member of the University of Texas board of regents. He was president of the Texas State Historical Association when he died in Mineral Wells, Texas, in 1912. Terrell County, Texas is named in his honor. (Submitted on November 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for General Alexander W. Terrell / Texas in the Civil War.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 99 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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